Linked by Tony Steidler-Dennison on Wed 30th Jul 2008 18:54 UTC
Linux "On those infrequent occasions when you need to reboot Linux, you may find that the process takes longer than you'd like. Jack Wallen shares a number of tricks you can use to reduce boot times." While these tips are intended to shorten Linux boot times, some can also increase the security of your system. Speed and security in ten tips, both well-known and obscure.
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Rare occasions?
by hornett on Wed 30th Jul 2008 20:11 UTC
hornett
Member since:
2005-09-19

Undoubtedly I will be downvoted for saying this, but I'm getting really tired of blanket statements like "Linux rarely needs to be rebooted" at the start of articles like this.

Frankly it's a myth for most desktop Linux users, and server boot times don't really mean much anyway.

Every time you update a kernel, or graphics drivers in Linux, you have to reboot and, since suspend doesn't seem to work anymore you have to shut down everytime you pop to the office with your laptop*. If you don't install the kernel security updates then you might as well run one of those other 'insecure' operating systems anyway.

* I have 4 different laptops currently with Linux installed, none resume reliably from suspend or hibernate.

The main content of the article is useful, however!

/rant ;-)

Reply Score: 7

RE: Rare occasions?
by parentaladvisory on Wed 30th Jul 2008 20:22 in reply to "Rare occasions?"
parentaladvisory Member since:
2006-12-18

Well, for kernelupdates that is true, you have to reload the kernel to use new code, and folowing that sense, it is NOT true that you need to reboot to use and updated video-driver, you only need to reload the graphics system to use the new code, ie. xorg, which is usually done by changing to a lower runlevel and then back to a runlevel that starts the X system... Or as simple as stoping kdm/gdm via an rc-script and then restaring that service... This is for debian at least... BTW, ctrl-alt-delete restarts the x-server, but for at least the nvidia-driver X arent allowed to run while installing/updating the driver, so thats why you need to stop the service abnd restart it afterwards...

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Rare occasions?
by melkor on Thu 31st Jul 2008 05:29 in reply to "RE: Rare occasions?"
melkor Member since:
2006-12-16

Correct - if the video driver is a module, no reboot should be required. Kill X (btw, it's typically ^ meta backspace). Kill gdm/xdm/kdm. Load module. Restart gdm etc and startx if necessary. Voila, should have desktop.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Rare occasions?
by Soulbender on Thu 31st Jul 2008 05:55 in reply to "RE: Rare occasions?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

BTW, ctrl-alt-delete restarts the x-server


That's ctrl-alt-backspace and it doesn't restart the X server as much as just kills it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Rare occasions?
by whartung on Wed 30th Jul 2008 21:35 in reply to "Rare occasions?"
whartung Member since:
2005-07-06

Undoubtedly I will be downvoted for saying this, but I'm getting really tired of blanket statements like "Linux rarely needs to be rebooted" at the start of articles like this.

Frankly it's a myth for most desktop Linux users, and server boot times don't really mean much anyway.


* I have 4 different laptops currently with Linux installed, none resume reliably from suspend or hibernate.


That's too bad, but to be fair that's one of the reasons I got a Mac is because sleep and hibernate DOES work reliably. We reboot when the random update comes down from Apple, both my tower and the laptop. Today, that's more and more rare since I still run 10.4 and my wife runs 10.3 on her iBook.

Other than that, just walk away from the machine and let it sleep, or close the laptop.

Seriously, this "instant on" and "instant off" ability is a poignant "quality of life" issue with computers for me nowadays. Having an "instantly" available computer combined with my "ubiquitous, always on" internet is major component to their value to me. If I had to boot up a machine to get on line, then it wouldn't happen. Power up...boot boot boot...web browser...shutdown...wait wait wait... Nope, sorry.

I do wish the Linux/BSDs/Solaris systems could get this part of the experience bullet proof.

Until then, when I get my next laptop, it's gonna be a Mac.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Rare occasions?
by hobgoblin on Thu 31st Jul 2008 02:34 in reply to "RE: Rare occasions?"
hobgoblin Member since:
2005-07-06

get the hardware companies to test using the intel tester for acpi, and stop pulling of cazy stuff like foxconn was recently discovered doing, and it should be there in no time.

until then its like hunting submarines by throwing rocks from dingies...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Rare occasions?
by ba1l on Thu 31st Jul 2008 11:37 in reply to "RE: Rare occasions?"
ba1l Member since:
2007-09-08

Power management actually works very well in Linux. If you run Linux on a Mac, without using any closed source drivers, it works as well as it does on a Mac running Mac OS X.

Where it falls down is closed-source drivers (particularly nVidia and ATI's video drivers), and buggy ACPI implementations on motherboards.

The last three laptops I've had all worked perfectly in Linux (except my Macbook's trackpad, which is unusable in anything but Mac OS), but a good half of the laptops I've looked at wouldn't have, either due to requiring closed-source drivers, or crappy ACPI.

My desktop machine crashes when waking from sleep though. Does the same running Windows, for that matter.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Rare occasions?
by Soulbender on Thu 31st Jul 2008 06:03 in reply to "Rare occasions?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I'm getting really tired of blanket statements like "suspend doesn't seem to work anymore". Frankly it's a myth for most desktop Linux users. Also, you really don't have to reboot when you install a new video driver.

The main content of the article is useful, however!

I found it mostly useless.

Reply Parent Score: 1