Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Aug 2008 22:21 UTC, submitted by tzineos
Legal Mac clone maker Psystar plans to file its answer to Apple's copyright infringement lawsuit Tuesday as well as a countersuit of its own, alleging that Apple engages in anticompetitive business practices. Miami-based Psystar, owned by Rudy Pedraza, will sue Apple under two federal laws designed to discourage monopolies and cartels, the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act, saying Apple's tying of the Mac OS to Apple-labeled hardware is "an anticompetitive restrain of trade", according to attorney Colby Springer of antitrust specialists Carr & Ferrell. Psystar is requesting that the court find Apple's EULA void, and is asking for unspecified damages. Psystar's attorneys are calling Apple's allegations of Psystar's copyright infringement "misinformed and mischaracterized". Psystar argues that its OpenComputer product is shipped with a fully licensed, unmodified copy of Mac OS X, and that the company has simply "leveraged open source-licensed code including Apple's OS" to enable a PC to run the Mac operating system.
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RE[2]: Broader issue ...
by Bully on Thu 28th Aug 2008 14:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Broader issue ..."
Bully
Member since:
2006-04-07


So, if this is true, it means that I can go buy a copy of a PC game and make it run on my PowerPC Mac, right? Cause, a software company cannot restrict what hardware the software runs on, right? Wrong.


What do you mean 'wrong'?
Ofcourse you can do that. Do you think the game creators would mind if you run their game through an emulator or what ever way you wanted to run it in different hardware?
Ofcourse not, as long as you bought their game they are happy as a clam.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Broader issue ...
by macUser on Thu 28th Aug 2008 15:47 in reply to "RE[2]: Broader issue ..."
macUser Member since:
2006-12-15


So, if this is true, it means that I can go buy a copy of a PC game and make it run on my PowerPC Mac, right? Cause, a software company cannot restrict what hardware the software runs on, right? Wrong.

What do you mean 'wrong'?
Ofcourse you can do that. Do you think the game creators would mind if you run their game through an emulator or what ever way you wanted to run it in different hardware?
Ofcourse not, as long as you bought their game they are happy as a clam.

But aren't they restricting the hardware I can install it on by not supporting my specific hardware?

Edited 2008-08-28 15:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Broader issue ...
by Alex Vancina on Thu 28th Aug 2008 16:14 in reply to "RE[3]: Broader issue ..."
Alex Vancina Member since:
2006-09-24

But aren't they restricting the hardware I can install it on by not supporting my specific hardware?


No, the game developer is not required to support your hardware. However, if some third-part comes along and provides you with an emulator that you can use to run the game on some hardware that's not officially supported, then the developer can't tell you that you're not allowed to do so.

No one is saying that Apple should be required to support Psystar's computers. Heck, no one's even saying that Apple can't make it difficult to run their software on non-Apple hardware. However, since Psystar has undertaken the development and support of their own Apple-compatible hardware, Apple has no legal grounds for saying that Psystar can't install a legitimately purchased copy of OS X on it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Broader issue ...
by fretinator on Thu 28th Aug 2008 16:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Broader issue ..."
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

But aren't they restricting the hardware I can install it on by not supporting my specific hardware?


Doh! So if I go buy a game, and then try to run it on my 286 and it doesn't work, then they are "restricting" me from running it on my hardware? Give me a break! All software is designed for some target specifications, which may or may not fit the particular machine you are using. It is up to you to get it to run on machines that do not fit the target specifications.

Back to the topic, the situation with Apple is different. Their software may run very well on my machine, but Apple is specifically saying I cannot run it on anything but their hardware. I think that is a grave error that will soon be corrected.

Reply Parent Score: 7