Linked by David Adams on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 16:40 UTC, submitted by judgen
Internet & Networking Most Firefox users don't realize that Firefox's current existence is owed almost exclusively to its search partnership with Google wherein Mozilla Corp receives a portion of ad revenue from Google queries initiated from Firefox's search bar. This revenue amounts to tens of millions of dollars. Internet users the world over, who are currently reaping the benefit of a renewed browser war with exciting innovation instead of Microsoft-dominated stagnation, can thank Google for that state of affairs. But now that Google has itself entered the fray with Chrome, what does that mean for the Firefox/Google relationship?
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RE[2]: Reinventing the wheel :(
by microFawad on Tue 23rd Dec 2008 20:10 UTC in reply to "RE: Reinventing the wheel :("
microFawad
Member since:
2005-12-09

I wouldn't even DREAM of going back to old-fashioned singlethreaded browsing.


First of all every browser today is multithreaded but the new thing that Google had done is to create a new process for each tab instead of creating a new thread for each tab.

Even if Google invested its time into Firefox, it would be a futile effort. Firefox is too big a project now to allow for such radical changes like a complete move to user-controlled multithreaded browsing. Google can't just come marching into Mozilla and make Firefox do a 360.


Do you know that IE8 is doing same thing that Chrome did. I mean creating a new process for each tab. So why not Mozilla and Google can do it in FF if Microsoft can do it in IE?

Reply Parent Score: 5

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Do you know that IE8 is doing same thing that Chrome did. I mean creating a new process for each tab. So why not Mozilla and Google can do it in FF if Microsoft can do it in IE?


Because as the post you replied to said, it's a huge change. I don't know what MS did for IE, but changing an application to be built on processes instead of threads likely means rebuilding it from the ground up. I don't mean the rendering engine - that's probably mostly fine, but all the UI shell would need to be reworked to support communication between processes. It's a huge effort.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

...but all the UI shell would need to be reworked to support communication between processes. It's a huge effort.

Meaning exactly the sort of thing that Mozilla Corp would never have considered without being shown up by real FOSS competition on their own doorstep. Isn't it wonderful that they now have such competition? I'm a Linux user, so I can't use Chrome (natively) yet, and don't really care for the Codeweavers solution. But I'm delighted that Chrome exists. And I look forward to full integration of Webkit in Epiphany 2.26 or 2.28.

Reply Parent Score: 4

microFawad Member since:
2005-12-09

I don't know what MS did for IE, but changing an application to be built on processes instead of threads likely means rebuilding it from the ground up


"IE8 uses the Loosely Coupled Internet Explorer (LCIE) architecture and runs the browser frame and tabs in separate processes"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Explorer_8#Performance_and_st...

Reply Parent Score: 1