Linked by Kroc Camen on Thu 25th Dec 2008 07:50 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Linux Heise Open Source provides an extensive breakdown of the innovations present in the latest release of the Linux kernel, announced by Linus Torvalds. This version adds the first version of Ext4 as a stable filesystem, the much-anticipated GPU memory manager which will be the foundation of a renewed graphic stack, support for Ultra Wide Band (Wireless USB, UWB-IP), memory management scalability and performance improvements, a boot tracer, disk shock protection, the phonet network protocol, support of SSD discard requests, transparent proxy support, high-resolution poll()/select()... full Changelog here
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RE: Amazing
by sbergman27 on Fri 26th Dec 2008 00:47 UTC in reply to "Amazing"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Linux kernel development is breathtaking at best

The play by play (advertised) details sound amazing. But overall, I still get the same feeling that I get when I see "New and improved!", "33% more!", and "33% less fat! 25% fewer calories!" on the labels at the grocery store. If everything is always so amazingly much better, why are we not all living like kings and queens?

Yeah, I think I see Andrew Morton out there quietly furrowing his brow and wondering about the ignored regressions.

Edited 2008-12-26 01:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Amazing
by siride on Fri 26th Dec 2008 04:31 in reply to "RE: Amazing"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

We do live like kings and queens, compared to the kings and queens of yesteryear. It just happens that the wealthy and powerful are also living relatively better off than before, so it gives us the illusion that we are still living in a craphole, when we are not.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Amazing
by abraxas on Fri 26th Dec 2008 06:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Amazing"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

We do live like kings and queens, compared to the kings and queens of yesteryear.


That depends on what you mean by yesteryear. Real wages are lower in the US today than they were a decade ago. If yesteryear means a thousand years ago then yes, we are living better than kings and queens of yesteryear.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Amazing
by halfmanhalfamazing on Sat 27th Dec 2008 10:26 in reply to "RE: Amazing"
halfmanhalfamazing Member since:
2005-07-23

If everything is always so amazingly much better, why are we not all living like kings and queens?


If you're an american or from most european countries you do live like a king/queen from way back in the day. Actually, you live way better than most kings/queens used to.

It's a good thing we have history books to see these things, because for most people "history" starts the day they are born.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Amazing
by lemur2 on Sun 28th Dec 2008 05:50 in reply to "RE: Amazing"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Linux kernel development is breathtaking at best

The play by play (advertised) details sound amazing. But overall, I still get the same feeling that I get when I see "New and improved!", "33% more!", and "33% less fat! 25% fewer calories!" on the labels at the grocery store. If everything is always so amazingly much better, why are we not all living like kings and queens?

Yeah, I think I see Andrew Morton out there quietly furrowing his brow and wondering about the ignored regressions.
"

FOSS development continues apace. It rolls along at a very healthy pace (compared to the competition) despite the intense efforts of those competitors to stop it or even slow it.

Right now what we seem to have coming in FOSS for early next year is beautiful, functional, stable, robust, secure and best-of-class-performing desktop software:

http://openmode.ca/2008/12/why-you-might-be-using-linux-in-2009/

http://nuno-icons.com/images/wall/snapshot3.jpg

Desktop software that will run extremely well on even quite modest hardware specifications.

The challenge is to get people to try it, or perhaps even get them to become aware of it.

Small inroads in this direction are starting to be made.

Edited 2008-12-28 05:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3