Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 14th Jan 2009 20:55 UTC
Apple It appears that Apple is not just going after Psystar when it comes to running Mac OS X on non-Apple branded computers. Wired's gadget blog was running a story, accompanied by a video, demonstrating how to install Mac OS X on a non-Apple netbook. After Apple contacted Wired, the website took down the video.
Thread beginning with comment 343570
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Just shows how crooked Apple is.
by jefro on Wed 14th Jan 2009 21:43 UTC
jefro
Member since:
2007-04-13

Any other company can't do business that way. What they are saying is they are loosing money on the software, forcing you to purchase their overpriced hardware. Kind of a bait and switch scheme. Kind of like saying I have to use (brand name) marine oil in this outboard motor or we won't warranty it. Pffsst.

They sold the software and it should be priced in a fair market value. Otherwise it is a scheme!

Edited 2009-01-14 22:01 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Buck Member since:
2005-06-29

They sold the software and it should be priced in a fair market value. Otherwise it is a scheme!

From Apple's POV the hardware and software are inseparable, at least when it comes to MacOSX. So the price is quite fair if you follow their rules. They don't allow running on third-party hardware, that's all, there's no scheme.

Reply Parent Score: 1

AtariFan Member since:
2009-01-15

If you buy a legal copy of MacOSX, usually on CD/DVD, Apple cannot enforce to buy an Apple computer too, even if they do so in their EULA. You may run the Mac OSX on the PC you want or already own, if possible, perhaps by means of additional hardware or software. Feel free!
Or has anybody heard of an book author who allows the buyer only to read the book in the author's garden?
An EULA is somehow comparable to German AGB's (Allgemeine Geschäftsbedingungen). If an AGB is too restrictive it can be discarded by justice.

Reply Parent Score: 2

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

From Apple's POV the hardware and software are inseparable, at least when it comes to MacOSX.


Too bad that POV is inconsistent with reality.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Jon Dough Member since:
2005-11-30

Any other company can't do business that way. What they are saying is they are loosing money on the software, forcing you to purchase their overpriced hardware. Kind of a bait and switch scheme. Kind of like saying I have to use (brand name) marine oil in this outboard motor or we won't warranty it. Pffsst.

They sold the software and it should be priced in a fair market value. Otherwise it is a scheme!


Apple didn't sell any software. They sold a license to use software. That's a distinct difference.

Reply Parent Score: 3

alcibiades Member since:
2005-10-12

No. You need to read Softman again, carefully. There are two independent contracts. In the first contract, you bought a copy of the software. Not a box, not a CD, a copy of the software. You have the right to resell this, repackage this, break it up (the software) into components and resell them piecemeal. To do this you will not have to enter into the EULA.

The second contract is the the EULA which you enter into when you click through. Its independent of the sales contract. This may or may not be binding, in particular, the clause which forbids you to install on non-Apple hardware may or may not be finding. This also may or may not be a license.

But the sale by which you acquired your copy was a sale, it was not a license. Read Softman.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Bernhard Member since:
2008-11-12

Any other company can't do business that way.

Of course they can. And they do. WGA is, in fact, nothing else.

From the OSX EULA:
2. Permitted License Uses and Restrictions.
A. Single Use. This License allows you to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time. You agree not to install, use or run the Apple Software on any non-Apple-labeled computer, or to enable others to do so.


Wired clearly breaches the EULA here, even on a large scale. Apple can argue that Wired even encourages others to do the same, which results in direct financial loss for Apple. Which takes us deep into "Apple vs. Psystar" territory.

Reply Parent Score: 2

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

WGA is, in fact, nothing else.


WGA limits your choice of hardware vendors? Since when?

Reply Parent Score: 1

AtariFan Member since:
2009-01-15

Thanks to the Admin for removing my wrong English correction post.

From the OSX EULA:
A. Single Use. This License allows you to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time. You agree not to install, use or run the Apple Software on any non-Apple-labeled computer, or to enable others to do so.


So it would not be okay to agree for continueing an OSX install on a non-Apple PC. Instead you should request Apple to deliver an OSX without this paragraph replacing the old one within a fair fixed time and enforce this in court if necessary. The restrictive part of the EULA will probably be discarded.
But for my own, I'm not that interested in OSX. In late 1994 I bought an Apple Performa 475 for running ASH's great Atari emulator MagicMac and liked the MacOS Classic, too. The Apple hardware then also was better than the one of a comparable 80486 PC (better bus speed, SCSI port). But now, Apple hardware is not better.

Reply Parent Score: 1

troc Member since:
2006-05-01

Wired are not allowing or facilitating others to do so.

Wired is a publication, it is reporting and demonstrating how easily it may be done. Educators, artists and reporters have many immunities and dispensations which allow them to function in the public interest and ignore laws.

In education this is called academic freedom, it allows for normal copyright law to be ignored, taboo subjects to be broached and our curiousity to be indulged.

Artists have artistic license, in which they distort, hide or fabricate facts for emotional or dramatic effect.

Reporters/bloggers work under something called 'freedom of the press'. If you remove that, as apple is doing; then you loose diversity of opinion or ideas and hence progress.

"Just shows how crooked Apple is.", greedy too.

Reply Parent Score: 1

alcibiades Member since:
2005-10-12

Wired has never signed the Eula. Never clicked through. Never entered into the contract. No obligations under it. Wake up. Read Softman. Again.

Reply Parent Score: 2