Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Feb 2009 14:11 UTC
Linux With Linux traditionally coming in many, many flavours, a common call among some Linux fans - but mostly among people who actually do not use Linux - is to standardise all the various distributions, and work from a single "one-distribution-to-rule-them-all". In a recent interview, Linus Tovalds discarded the idea, stating that he thinks "it's something absolutely required!"
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RE: Pretty Clearcut - my preference
by jabbotts on Wed 4th Feb 2009 17:07 UTC in reply to "Pretty Clearcut"
jabbotts
Member since:
2007-09-06

I think that's the key right there. Don't complicate a simple thing; select from the obvious short list of distros. For me, that's Mandriva on desktop and Debian on servers.

If your going servers for business it's Red Hat or Suse where support contracts and fees are desirable. if your going it alone the choice is Debian, OpenBSD, NetBSD or FreeBSD and your all set. (I like Debian because it's supported by HP as a company policy; if it can't be supported inhouse anymore then you just call them up and ask about service contracts)

Reply Parent Score: 4

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I think that's the key right there. Don't complicate a simple thing; select from the obvious short list of distros. For me, that's Mandriva on desktop and Debian on servers.


Yeah, it's simple for you, but to somebody looking from the outside in, it is a massive clusterf**k.

You guys can continue to preach that having 9 million distros is a godo thing, and you can continue to have the majority of computer users not running Linux.

While it's true that those in the '9 million distros or bust!' camp might be right, you have to ask yourself how important it is to be right vs whether or not you want more people to try out Linux and not be scared away by the number if distros that are out there.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TheIdiotThatIsMe Member since:
2006-06-17

Yeah, it's simple for you, but to somebody looking from the outside in, it is a massive clusterf**k.

While it's true that those in the '9 million distros or bust!' camp might be right, you have to ask yourself how important it is to be right vs whether or not you want more people to try out Linux and not be scared away by the number if distros that are out there.


Well, here's how I look at it. There are usually two ways someone is going to start Linux: either they are introduced or they are out looking for one by themselves.

If someone is introduced, then I stand by my earlier assertion that the person introducing them need to keep it simple by using what they are used to and can support. For example, Dell does not offer 200+ distributions: they offer ONE preconfigured Linux operating system, and that works fine. The same should be done with a person introducing another person. Again, what I do with Ubuntu + Wubi.

On the other hand, if someone is out actively and seriously looking for something such as an alternative operating system for a computer, then they are either ALREADY looking for choice and wanting to explore, or are looking for some thing supported (and sometimes free) because they are having problems with their current OS. If they are looking because they are having problems with their current, all you have to do is just spend a little time reading.

Every person who uses Linux NOW has had to make a choice. It took me a whole 20 minutes, looking at only the top few that were free (Fedora/OpenSuse/Ubuntu), and having chosen by their websites that detail their operating systems. If I didn't like it, I knew I could switch. I ended up liking it. Now, if someone is actively seeking a serious replacement, but doesn't want to do the research on which one, they can just order an OEM Linux machine.

So, if someone is "actively looking", if even after complaining about not wanting to look at any of the top distros, or don't want to get an OEM machine like they would with Windows or MacOSX, then they are not really actively seeking something new, they are just complaining about what they have, and want just what they have without the problems. And that, of course, is not what Linux is.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Lunitik Member since:
2005-08-07

I always laugh at this... when I first entered the Linux community, it really wasn't that complicated. Its not like enough people haven't tried to make the decision making process easier anyways...

We don't want one size fits all... that is what other OS's have tried and failed at.

Linux is about fitting the system for you.

Reply Parent Score: 3

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

How does one manage to choose a breakfast cereal or flavour of icecream? Dare I say; choose a model of car?

The people who make a point of complicating the choice are usually detractors trying to feel better by putting something else down. Really, you can choose in five questions or less and since the average user who would have an issue choosing is unlikely to be installing there own system anyhow, it becomes up to the store rep or system tech.

For those that want to give a go alone:
Ubuntu
Mandriva
PCLinuxOS
Suse

Pick one or all and give them a try. Booting a liveCD on one's system or for someone who is looking at systems takes five minutes per option. The first two will probably provide a selection though the third is well liked and the fourth give the business folks a brand name to feel good about.

The only reason it's easy for me is because I took some time to look at the options. I do the same for any purchase or selection though. I wouldn't toss any old cogs on my mountain bike. I don't grab a shirt off the first rack in the store and buy it without trying it on or looking at the other available items.

Reply Parent Score: 5