Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Feb 2009 21:20 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Netbooks have been heralded as the foot in the door for Linux. With the launch of the earliest Eee PC models, Asus made a bold move by only offering them with Linux pre-installed; Microsoft soon responded by working with Asus to bring Windows XP to the next generation Eee PCs. Since then, Windows XP gained market share in the netbook segment rapidly, casting doubts over whether or not netbooks would really turn out to be that foot in the door. HP has today announced that its new HP Mini 1000 netbook will not be available with Linux pre-installed in Europe.
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RE[3]: HP is absolutely right
by raver31 on Fri 6th Feb 2009 09:11 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: HP is absolutely right"
raver31
Member since:
2005-07-06

I too have had problems, like Atheros drivers for Ubuntu on the Aspire One, RT2500 repeatedly dropping sync on Mandriva for example.

I didn't mean it was all plain sailing. I said in the original post that MORE hardware works out of the box under Linux.

The OP was spreading the old FUD about printers/scanners/and webcams. Those problems are pretty much fixed with most newer kernels supporting v4l devices as standard, and the leaps and bounds CUPS has made.


Another point I was making was about the internet connection. It does not matter if you get the drivers from the manufacturer or from somewhere like driveragent. If you have not got an internet connection, because Windows does not support your networking hardware out of the box, then you are not going to be able to download any drivers in the first place.

I would also like to add to something Worknman said, why should they offer a Windows version and a blank version ? While it is true that the user can format and add whatever they like, what is the point of Joe User buying a blank machine ? That is going to add up to another sale for a Windows license, when the poor smoe was just looking for something for email and web browsing..... exactly why netbooks exist in the first place.

Edited 2009-02-06 09:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

The OP was spreading the old FUD about printers/scanners/and webcams. Those problems are pretty much fixed with most newer kernels supporting v4l devices as standard, and the leaps and bounds CUPS has made.


I'll agree the OP was trolling, which is why I was hesitant at responding. CUPS and SANE definitely cover an insane amount of hardware nowadays. (although OCR support isn't too hot)

I would also like to add to something Worknman said, why should they offer a Windows version and a blank version ? While it is true that the user can format and add whatever they like, what is the point of Joe User buying a blank machine ? That is going to add up to another sale for a Windows license, when the poor smoe was just looking for something for email and web browsing..... exactly why netbooks exist in the first place.


Because another 30-40$ on a 400$ machine to be able to use an os that is familiar to Joe is typically worth the relatively small overhead. The thing with Joe is that he hates having to spend any time learning anything he doesn't have to about computers, so the more familiar the the better, and if 40$ saves the hours he has already spent getting comfortable with windows, there is no reason for him not to pay it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23


Because another 30-40$ on a 400$ machine to be able to use an os that is familiar to Joe is typically worth the relatively small overhead. The thing with Joe is that he hates having to spend any time learning anything he doesn't have to about computers, so the more familiar the the better, and if 40$ saves the hours he has already spent getting comfortable with windows, there is no reason for him not to pay it.

Exactly and if he adds $50, he can have a bigger screen that will save him one hour configuring those stupid applications to work with small screen and learning F11 on Firefox. If he adds another $50, he can have a phone support and save some more hours learning to use his computer. If he adds another $50, he might have a course on computers that will save him more time learning by himself. If he adds another $50, he can pay someone to write his emails instead of learning how to use email software. But then for that price plus another $50, he can hire a secretary and save some hours learning and stuff. If you add a lot of $50, even can even stop working and have a staff of people learning and doing the work for him.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: HP is absolutely right
by raver31 on Fri 6th Feb 2009 15:53 in reply to "RE[4]: HP is absolutely right"
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

What does someone need to learn for a Net Appliance?
Firefox ? Thunderbird ? An explorer type program from accessing your files ?

Netbooks are appliances, simple as that.


Take a trip up to your local computer store and ask them to stick an Aspire One with Linux out on display for people to play with. They love it for some reason, I think it is the simplicity of the 4 boxes on the display.

Edited 2009-02-06 15:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3