Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Feb 2009 23:28 UTC
Editorial Does Windows 7 contain more DRM than Windows Vista? Does Windows 7 limit you from running cracked applications, and will it open the firewall specifically for applications that want to check if they're cracked or not? Does it limit the audio recording capabilities? According to a skimp and badly written post on Slashdot, it does. The Slashdot crowd tore the front page item apart - and rightfully so.
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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

DRM itself is "black helicopter". No-one is allowed to know who it works. There is something in Vista that sucks performance, and DRM is an excellent candidate, given that it is invoked at 30ms intervals.


Stop lying, lemur2. As I've already pointed out to you in a comment you so skillfully ignored: the protected paths (the DRM) and thus the polling are only invoked WHEN YOU USE DRM'd CONTENT. Since practically no media make use of the protected paths, THERE IS NO POLLING.

Got it?

Edited 2009-02-19 02:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"DRM itself is "black helicopter". No-one is allowed to know who it works. There is something in Vista that sucks performance, and DRM is an excellent candidate, given that it is invoked at 30ms intervals.
Stop lying, lemur2. As I've already pointed out to you in a comment you so skillfully ignored: the protected paths (the DRM) and thus the polling are only invoked WHEN YOU USE DRM'd CONTENT. Since practically no media make use of the protected paths, THERE IS NO POLLING. Got it? "

If there is to be polling of "protected paths" when there is DRM'd content present, then there must at least be polling "if there is DRM'd content present" that occurs every 30ms in order to switch it on. No?

Why would I be lying? I have already said that no-one knows how DRM works. I have already said that this is speculation. What we do know is that Vista has lethargic performance on high-end hardware that gets considerably worse for lower-end hardware. I have speculated that the DRM polling is a good candidate for what has caused this lethargy. So far, no one has been able to say that it isn't, despite the desperate attempts to do so.

The question that I always get back to is this ... why can't I get a version of Vista without the DRM? If my machine cannot play HD video content anyway, why do I need to have DRM embedded in my OS? Of what possible use is it in such a machine?

If I want to run Windows then perhaps (more speculation here) I must have DRM because Microsoft doesn't want it to be possible for anyone to benchmark a Vista machine without DRM against a Vista machine with DRM? Just sayin ...

Edited 2009-02-19 02:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 9

wanderingk88 Member since:
2008-06-26

The question that I always get back to is this ... why can't I get a version of Vista without the DRM? If my machine cannot play HD video content anyway, why do I need to have DRM embedded in my OS? Of what possible use is it in such a machine?


If my machine cannot make use of the bazillion drivers in the generic Linux kernel that comes with Ubuntu, why do I need to have them embedded? Of what possible use are them in such a machine?

See how stupid that question sounds?

Either way, I'm far from being a Microsoft advocate (extremely far, seeing how I run Linux in every machine I own), but the problem with DRM embedded in Vista HAS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO WITH PERFORMANCE. AT ALL.

The problem with DRM in Vista has to do with giving Hollywood's the unethical claims for intellectual property a free pass. The problem is that whenever a customer buys Vista, he or she is accepting Hollywood's terms without even knowing it. That's the REAL problem.

The rest is just bullshit. Pure and simple.

Reply Parent Score: 1

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

The question that I always get back to is this ... why can't I get a version of Vista without the DRM? If my machine cannot play HD video content anyway, why do I need to have DRM embedded in my OS? Of what possible use is it in such a machine?


Well, look at it this way... whatever performance issues that Vista has, Windows 7 (with the same level or DRM) doesn't have the same issues. So either they found a way to properly optimize the DRM, or else the performance issues in Vista aren't related to DRM.

Either way, just wait for Windows 7 to come out, which isn't slow like Vista is, so you won't have a reason to bitch about it anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 0

OddFox Member since:
2005-10-05

Why would I be lying? I have already said that no-one knows how DRM works. I have already said that this is speculation. What we do know is that Vista has lethargic performance on high-end hardware that gets considerably worse for lower-end hardware. I have speculated that the DRM polling is a good candidate for what has caused this lethargy. So far, no one has been able to say that it isn't, despite the desperate attempts to do so.

This right here says it all. You are arguing out of ignorance and acting like nobody at all knows how the DRM subsystem works. If you don't understand the intelligent way to implement such a system then don't talk about it like it's a given everyone else is as clueless as yourself. There is no system-wide poll every X amount of minutes or seconds to see if DRM content is playing. The only time the system checks for DRM capability and then enables the protected path is WHEN YOU LOAD MULTIMEDIA THAT DEMANDS IT, DRM-ED MEDIA.

It makes absolutely no sense to constantly check to see if anything has asked to enable the protected media path. This would be like Valve Anti-Cheat or PunkBuster or Warden running full system assessments every X amount of minutes/seconds in order to make sure you aren't cheating in any of the games that utilize them. It's freakin' stupid because you aren't always going to be utilizing them, they are only brought into the mix when you play a game that uses them. Does the protected media path have the potential to cause slowdown? I guess we might find out when any media producers begin to use it in the years to come. For now, nobody's making use of it and it's pretty much just sitting there unused until Hollywood decides they want to start shipping Blu-Ray and HD-DVD discs that will only play on a protected system.

Reply Parent Score: 1