Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 23rd Mar 2009 23:25 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Microsoft After the iPhone's success with the easy installation of applications using the iPhone App Store, more and more companies have tried to implement similar application delivery models in other markets. The most recent example is Microsoft, who has launched a sot of app store for... Open source server software. Yes, you read that right.
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comment all the over from Belfast UK
by raver31 on Tue 24th Mar 2009 00:11 UTC
raver31
Member since:
2005-07-06

So what ?

Microsoft decides to include open source software in the repositories and eweek decide this is a story ?

It is open source so anyone is free to distribute it, as long as they dont claim they OWN it. These rights also include Microsoft's rights to distribute it as well.

Maybe Microsoft realise that they cannot charge customers for each and every piece of software, much as they would like to, but to actively promote giving away software might make one or two people stick with Windows a while longer, rather than make the jump to Linux, BSD or another open source system.

Microsoft should neither be applauded nor reprimanded for this move, it is simply another service.

Edited 2009-03-24 00:12 UTC

Reply Score: 4

TBPrince Member since:
2005-07-06

True. But I bet MS is only including selected open-source software which runs well on Windows/IIS. That's not innovative at all, of course, but it's a good service for Windows Server users willing to discover which software is somewhat "endorsed" (meaning, they suggest it runs very well on Windows).

Nice service, under their point of view.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I think its an admission that the easiest to use, most popular web applications are not Microsoft specific ( as they don't require any MS software and are written in php). Apparently, Microsoft believes that there is also an audience that would like the familiarity of a windows server to run these open source apps on.


I really am confused why anyone would want to run wordpress on a MS server. I can't imagine many people would want to. Furthermore, they're only including MSSQL server express edition. Mysql really would have been a more natural choice for wordpress, drupal, et all.

Reply Parent Score: 1

TBPrince Member since:
2005-07-06

I think its an admission that the easiest to use, most popular web applications are not Microsoft specific ( as they don't require any MS software and are written in php).


You're discovering warm water. That was a fact. Biggest communities of developers are those using Java and PHP. In recent years Microsoft was able to put two feet inside middle-end market and a foot inside high-end market but it's still far in low-end market. When did anyone from MS said that they rule Web apps market?

[q] Apparently, Microsoft believes that there is also an audience that would like the familiarity of a windows server to run these open source apps on. I really am confused why anyone would want to run wordpress on a MS server. I can't imagine many people would want to.[q/]

That's because you don't know how good those platforms are. And you also seem not to know how much MS web platform grew in last 3-4 years (since Win2003).

Reply Parent Score: 2

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

I really am confused why anyone would want to run wordpress on a MS server. I can't imagine many people would want to.


Speaking as someone who regularly works with both UNIX and Windows-based hosting, it makes sense if you already have a need for Windows-based hosting - and you want to use WordPress as well. It's also not terribly difficult, considering that PHP and MySQL both run just fine on Windows-based servers, and so does Apache for that matter.

I actually see the above as a point in favour of UNIX-based servers (and the *AMP stack in general) - the reason being that PHP/MySQL/etc apps can usually run fine on either UNIX or Windows servers. But the reverse isn't true - an ASP/MSSQL app is effectively limited to Windows servers.

Reply Parent Score: 2