Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Mar 2009 23:34 UTC
Amiga & AROS Despite the recent emergence of several new ways to actually run AmigaOS 4.0, the supply of machines is still extremely small, and not very future proof. As such, one of the most recurring questions within the Amiga community is why don't they port the darn thing to x86?
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Why?
by Snake007uk on Fri 27th Mar 2009 17:01 UTC
Snake007uk
Member since:
2005-07-20

I appreciate the need for different OS's (competition etc...)

What does AmigaOS do that Linux/Windows/OSX/BSD/(add others here..) can't do?

Maybe its not a functionality thing, but I would like to know what it is? I my self have a vista desktop, OSX latop (leopard), Linux desktop.

I use mainly my OSX machine, because I use it at work. Windows Machine at home is maily there for windows stuff, like gaming, Linux because I prefer it as a developing platform (Python).

I still dont see the thrill of Amiga or Acorn, apart from that they run on very small amounts of memory to be honest this isnt a big deal anymore most machines have gigs of memory.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Why?
by SamuraiCrow on Fri 27th Mar 2009 17:55 in reply to "Why?"
SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

I still dont see the thrill of Amiga or Acorn, apart from that they run on very small amounts of memory to be honest this isnt a big deal anymore most machines have gigs of memory.


You're still thinking as a desktop user. Amiga's small memory footprint would have made it a good handheld OS at one time. The problem is that as AmigaOS 4.1 started to embrace modern programming practices their memory footprint started to grow. The more features they add the less competitive they become.

I think we should go with the Natami team and try to rejuvenate AmigaOS 3.9 and AROS 68k if we're going for any sort of Amiga platform integration that we had going for us back in the day.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Why?
by dragossh on Fri 27th Mar 2009 19:03 in reply to "Why?"
dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

Why do we need huge amounts of memory in the first place? How can AmigaOS and Haiku run great with a small amount of memory, while Windows, OS X and to a certain extent Linux need gigabytes of memory to run well?

Heck, how could BeOS play 10 videos, record one, rip an audio CD at the same time and still respond quickly to user input - all without a hardware accelerated desktop - on 1998's underpowered hardware while Windows' UI still hangs sometimes?

And if Hyperion can't port AmigaOS to x86, what about MorphOS?

Reply Parent Score: 3