Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st Apr 2009 09:36 UTC, submitted by davidiwharper
Windows Windows Vista wasn't exactly a success, and as such, Microsoft needed different people to manage the development of Windows 7. One of those new people is Julie Larson-Green, who made a very good showing with Microsoft Office 2007, which took the bold move of replacing the menu-driven interface with the newly designed Ribbon interface. The Sydney Morning Herald (awesome name) decided to take a look at who, exactly, Larson-Green is.
Thread beginning with comment 359727
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: UI Changes vs Expense...
by dragossh on Tue 21st Apr 2009 16:56 UTC in reply to "UI Changes vs Expense..."
dragossh
Member since:
2008-12-16

There are literally millions of people who have been specifically trained to deal with one UI of Microsoft Office ( Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc... ) - at great expense. The interface change is causing massive headaches in more time-critical environments.

And that, my friends, is the big problem. You don't train people how to operate a specific piece of software, you make them understand how that piece of software works, so they can adjust rapidly to further changes.

Reply Parent Score: 1

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

You don't train people how to operate a specific piece of software, you make them understand how that piece of software works, so they can adjust rapidly to further changes.


I agree with the fundamental premise - with any sort of education, the ideal should be teaching basic principles which can then be applied to specific circumstances. That approach trains people to be adaptable.

The problem is that it's much easier to learn (and to teach) how to deal with specific sets of circumstances - so that's usually what happens, even though it results in people who are effectively helpless when confronted with circumstances that they weren't trained to deal with. E.g., in previous job I used to teach a basic "Intro to computers" course" - most of the students actually had used computers back in the 80s, but their training (and usage) had been completely limited to old DOS versions of WordPerfect.

It's basically the idea of "instant gratification" applied to education - and I see that as a problem with education in general, not just computer training.

There's an excellent essay on that topic called "How we confuse Symbols and Things":

http://www.arachnoid.com/lutusp/symbols.html

Reply Parent Score: 2