Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 26th Sep 2005 03:34 UTC
General Unix The end of the world is near. At last that of the Unix world. That's the prediction of Donald Feinberg, vice-president of Gartner. "Linux is coming, Unix is dead." But there's no need to panic. Not just yet. The end is not going to come overnight or even in next week or year, but it is certain, or as he puts it, "an absolute".
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RE: MacUser
by the_trapper on Mon 26th Sep 2005 04:31 UTC in reply to "MacUser"
the_trapper
Member since:
2005-07-07

I probably shouldn't reply to you because you smell disturbingly like a troll, but they meant "real" big-iron traditional UNIX.

HP-UX, AIX, Irix, SCO, Tru64 and Solaris. Of these, Tru64 is unfortunately pretty much already dead. SCO, well we all know where their software is going. Irix, AIX, and HP-UX have pretty much already been put into an almost deprecated status by their respective vendors in favor of Linux. Solaris will probably co-exist for a long time, especially if their OpenSolaris initiative takes off. I'll admit, if I had a computer capable of running it, I'd seriously think about switching away from Linux. Solaris running on commodity hardware is a geek's wet dream. (It's real UNIX open sourced!)

The BSDs (which Apple's Darwin and Mac OS X are derived from) are for all intents and purposes their own special branch of the *nix family tree. Think of them as extremely close cousins of UNIX, but not really having any UNIX "blood" in them anymore. They are very much along the same vein as Linux, UNIX work-alikes that share absolutely no source code with their System V-derived cousins. (Well, technically some of them have ripped drivers and networking code and the csh out of them, but there is no UNIX code in the BSDs.)

So, despite what Apple wants to tell you, Mac OS X is not really a UNIX. Neither is Free/Net/Open/DragonFlyBSD or Linux.

Ultimately, the UNIX space will be partitioned among the open source *nixes and Windows Server, with most of the pie going to Linux. UNIX will live on in a niche role, much like OS/2, Multics, and VMS before it.

This is a pretty uninteresting article all and all. Kind of a "Thank you Captain Obvious" thing.

I also predict that OS/2 and VMS use will continue to decline as well. Big whoop.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: MacUser
by derekmorr on Mon 26th Sep 2005 04:56 in reply to "RE: MacUser"
derekmorr Member since:
2005-09-25

"Irix, AIX, and HP-UX have pretty much already been put into an almost deprecated status by their respective vendors in favor of Linux."

Not at all true for AIX. All of IBM's new hardware features are available first on AIX, and IBM essentially considers AIX part of the DB2 software stack.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: MacUser
by butters on Mon 26th Sep 2005 06:14 in reply to "RE: MacUser"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

You're really mixed up in your understanding of the UNIX space. Tru64 has been deprecated by HP-UX, which in and of itself is beginning to die along with the Itanium architecture. Windows Server doesn't fit anywhere in the UNIX space. If you have UNIX applications, you don't run them on Windows Server. IBM pSeries is the biggest selling and fastest growing enterprise server platform in the UNIX space, and while IBM is pushing Linux on POWER (OpenPOWER), there is no roadmap that calls for offering Linux on pSeries. Similarly, Sun is committed to Solaris on SPARC, and even positions Solaris (alongside Linux) on x86-64.

Many of the OS names you pulled from the graveyard have no relevence to the discussion, historical or otherwise. Multics was written for the GE mainframes in assembly and wasn't portable. VMS runs on three dead or nearly dead architecturs: VAX, Alpha, and Itanium. OS/2 is a desktop OS that was created as an IBM fork of MS-DOS with the cooperation of Microsoft. It is officially EOL at the end of 2005.

The point is, proprietary UNIX (including Solaris, which is still proprietary to Sun even though it is open source) lives or dies on the back of its hardware platforms. HP-UX depends on Itanium, Solaris depends on SPARC, AIX depends on POWER. Linux (adoption) depends on x86. Despite its support for all of the previous listed architectures and more, corporate IT won't choose Linux on anything other than x86. Linux has been so successful because x86 has been the fastest growing segment of IT for years, while the proprietary UNIX vendors largely ignored it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: MacUser
by on Mon 26th Sep 2005 07:22 in reply to "RE[2]: MacUser"
Member since:

Very well put, except one thing. Linux and now apparently OpenSolaris is not centric to only arch by any means. Right now I have an ibook and an amd64 box both running Linux. I just read that OpenSolaris has been ported to ppc. Also IBM has big stakes in getting Linux happy on their hardware, such as their work with the 970FX power management in Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: MacUser
by on Mon 26th Sep 2005 14:39 in reply to "RE[2]: MacUser"
Member since:

IO don't know why VMS was even mentioned here. it is NOT a unix variant at all. Completely different.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: MacUser
by on Mon 26th Sep 2005 06:17 in reply to "RE: MacUser"
Member since:

Solaris running on commodity hardware is a geek's wet dream. (It's real UNIX open sourced!)

This may be the case in a few years if community developers get involved, but for now, I hate using Solaris. It has a lot of power, but it lacks a lot of the great tools that come standard in a Linux distribution. At least that's my view.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: MacUser
by derekmorr on Mon 26th Sep 2005 14:20 in reply to "RE[3]: MacUser"
derekmorr Member since:
2005-09-25

That's funny, I saythe opposite all the time. Using linux is painful because its p-tools suck, it doesn't have dtrace, mdb, dbx, resource management, etc.

What tools do you think Solaris is missing?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: MacUser
by Lazarus on Tue 27th Sep 2005 03:37 in reply to "RE: MacUser"
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

"Well, technically some of them have ripped drivers and networking code and the csh out of them, but there is no UNIX code in the BSDs"

Ahem. (c) UNIX System Laboratories, Inc.

http://fxr.watson.org/fxr/source/sys/timeb.h?v=RELENG6

There are other files with the USL copyright in them. I'll leave finding them as an excercise for you.

Do your homework next time. The BSDs damned well do have UNIX code in them, although not much.

Reply Parent Score: 1