Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th May 2009 19:06 UTC
Linux We all know them. We all hate them. They are generally overdone, completely biased, or so vague they border on the edge of pointlessness (or toppled over said edge). Yes, I'm talking about those "Is Linux ready for the desktop" articles. Still, this one is different.
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RE[4]: Comment by pcunite
by steviant on Tue 19th May 2009 10:20 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by pcunite"
steviant
Member since:
2006-01-11

Double Buffering and Alpha Blending is provided by using any method of "indirect rendering" which has been in Linux since at least 2005 looking at my screenshot archive, all drawing operations in X have been hardware accelerated using OpenGL since the introduction of AIGLX into Xorg a couple of years back.

It's true that X11 lacked the 2D hardware acceleration that was used by Windows GDI for many years but even the biggest 2D acceleration cheerleader Microsoft has now moved beyond GDI's 2D acceleration paradigm to a more generic strategy using DirectX.

Windows Vista (and 7), Mac OS X and Linux are pretty much on the same page when it comes to desktop graphics these days.

You make it hard to swallow your arguments about how far behind Linux is when you obviously haven't looked in years.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Comment by pcunite
by Soulbender on Tue 19th May 2009 12:27 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by pcunite"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Stop confusing us with actual facts. Real men argue using unsubstantiated opinions thinly veiled as matters of fact.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by pcunite
by steviant on Tue 19th May 2009 12:39 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by pcunite"
steviant Member since:
2006-01-11

Oh sorry,

What I meant to say was...

Windows is crap because:
* it doesn't even have a real desktop, just "Program Manager"
* the 32-bit ABI is an add-on
* it still runs on top of DOS
* windows disappear when you minimize them and you have to un-maximize program manager to see them
* there's no 3D support except 3DFX
* you have to use trumpet winsock to connect to the internet
* the latest browser you can get is Netscape 4.
* doesn't support recently released hardware

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by pcunite
by DavidSan on Tue 19th May 2009 17:18 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by pcunite"
DavidSan Member since:
2008-11-18

Double Buffering and Alpha Blending is provided by using any method of "indirect rendering" which has been in Linux since at least 2005 looking at my screenshot archive, all drawing operations in X have been hardware accelerated using OpenGL since the introduction of AIGLX into Xorg a couple of years back.

It's true that X11 lacked the 2D hardware acceleration that was used by Windows GDI for many years but even the biggest 2D acceleration cheerleader Microsoft has now moved beyond GDI's 2D acceleration paradigm to a more generic strategy using DirectX.

Windows Vista (and 7), Mac OS X and Linux are pretty much on the same page when it comes to desktop graphics these days.

You make it hard to swallow your arguments about how far behind Linux is when you obviously haven't looked in years.


I look at Linux every day. If you believe that a Linux desktop with AIGLX is on par of Windows or Mac, you must be blind.

Besides, it is not a problem with hardware acceleration. Mac OS X works with double buffering by default even in hardware that does not support 3D acceleration. It supports double buffering since the public beta in 1999.

Double buffering has nothing to do with hardware acceleration. That's another thing.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by pcunite
by steviant on Tue 19th May 2009 18:14 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by pcunite"
steviant Member since:
2006-01-11

I'm not sure what kind of special third-eye allows you to see differences in rendering infrastructure, but I suspect it might be the one in your arse.

I'm prepared to accept on face value your notion that Linux looks like shit. But that is not the fault of the rendering system.

I find it bizarre that you should be so focused on double-buffering on the desktop, as it's something that only came to Windows with Aero, and Windows is the only operating system which requires hardware acceleration for double-buffering.

If you're trying to claim Windows XP is unsuitable for the desktop, I think about 70% of the world would disagree.

Around 2005 "indirect rendering" provided double-buffering and the ability to perform transforms in the offscreen buffer allowing for "compositing managers" and alpha-blending. - That is the rough equivalent of Mac OS X's Quartz (10.0) rendering, and slightly technologically ahead of Windows GDI (2000/XP).

More recently XGL and AIGLX have come along offering accelerated transforms on windows between the offscreen buffer and the screen allowing for distractions like wobbly windows and more practical applications like hardware accelerated live-zooming, - The rough equivalent of Windows Aero (Vista/7) and Mac OS X's Quartz Extreme (10.2).

Reply Parent Score: 2