Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 27th Jul 2009 20:10 UTC
KDE For a very long time now, I've been on the hunt for a distribution that really put a lot of effort into their KDE4 implementation. This has been a frustrating search, full of broken installations, incredibly slow performance, and so many visual artifacts they made my eyes explode. Since KDE 4.3 is nearing release, I had to pick up this quest in order to take a look at where 4.3 stands - and I found a home in the KDE version of Fedora 11. Read on for a look as to where KDE 4.3 currently stands.
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RE: distribution for KDE?!
by dagw on Tue 28th Jul 2009 08:42 UTC in reply to "distribution for KDE?!"
dagw
Member since:
2005-07-06

Oh, one more, for years I've been mad about how boring and ugly screenshots people show about kde (or gnome for that matter) in reviews. Well, I see that will never ever change.

I hope it never does change. I want my screenshots in reviews to be as simple and boring and default as possible. Screen shots should be used to illustrate certain features or failings which are easier to show than to describe. Anything which distracts from showing off the feature should be left out of the screenshot.

Screen shots packed full of dozens of third party apps and tweaks showing off nothing but the users questionable aesthetic tastes don't really serve any purpose in a review.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: distribution for KDE?!
by molnarcs on Tue 28th Jul 2009 11:35 in reply to "RE: distribution for KDE?!"
molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

Screen shots packed full of dozens of third party apps and tweaks showing off nothing but the users questionable aesthetic tastes don't really serve any purpose in a review.


I beg to differ - showing off the capabilities and flexibility of a desktop environment is a valid reason for reviews. Now you can describe customizations (click this menu, select that, than push that button on the bottom left corner) or... you can show a screenshot of a heavily customized desktop illustrating what you can do with it.

Edit> I agree though that customizations should be done with the default tools available in the specific implementation. System Settings, GetHotNewStuff, etc qualifies - you know the tools that are immediately visible to the average user. Stuff you download from kde-apps and compile them yourself don't qualify.

Edited 2009-07-28 11:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2