Linked by Kroc Camen on Tue 28th Jul 2009 09:55 UTC
Podcasts We focus on this week's tit-for-tat bickering between Microsoft, the GPL and Linus [Torvalds]; and Apple and Palm--caught tugging either end of iTunes with neither willing to let go. Can't we all just get along?
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Philip Grant
Member since:
2008-12-28

"iTunes created to sell iPods


I've heard that frequently in the last few weeks, but the reality is that the first iPod came out in (late) 2001, while iTunes was released in January of 2001. It would be hard for iTunes to have been created to sell a product that came out later on.
"

Itunes began to be developed before Apple got its hands on it in, in about 2000, but at some point it was aligned as an interface for the iPod. Not how it started, but what it became, adding the iTunes store too.

Myself, I can't see anything wrong with developing their software exclusively for their hardware. Anyway, imagine a far better device than an iPod or iPhone came on the market, but wasn't able to connect to iTunes, but then Apple opened up iTunes to any device, it would seem fair to allow that new device to block iTunes and to operate only with its own software. It's swings and roundabouts... At the moment there is more competition to compete with Apple and the iTunes store if you are locked out of iTunes.

Patents last so long and technology catches up, nothing stays the same... but if such practices stay the same, everything will be fair in time. Live by the sword, die by the sword.

Reply Parent Score: 1

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Itunes began to be developed before Apple got its hands on it in, in about 2000, but at some point it was aligned as an interface for the iPod. Not how it started, but what it became, adding the iTunes store too.


Yes - IIRC, iTunes was based on an app called SoundJam which Apple bought the code/rights to.

Myself, I can't see anything wrong with developing their software exclusively for their hardware.


They're certainly within their rights to lock third parties out of iTunes, but it's the sort of thing that doesn't particularly encourage me - as a consumer - to purchase their products.

It makes me wonder: if they were to start selling an Apple DSLR or an Apple scanner, would iPhoto suddenly lose the ability work with third-party digicams/scanners?

And, at least on OS X, it also contradicts one of their oft-cited advantages: the availability of one, built-in application that can interface with hardware from multiple vendors - as opposed to the Windows world, where each hardware vendor "rolls their own" (often with piss-poor results).

Reply Parent Score: 2

Philip Grant Member since:
2008-12-28



And, at least on OS X, it also contradicts one of their oft-cited advantages: the availability of one, built-in application that can interface with hardware from multiple vendors - as opposed to the Windows world, where each hardware vendor "rolls their own" (often with piss-poor results).


hahahaha yeah! That's ironic. "On a Mac it just works." Unless they don't want it to.

Reply Parent Score: 1