Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 24th Sep 2009 13:35 UTC, submitted by Hiev
Mono Project If you don't like personal, blog-style reporting, you might want to skip this item. A few days ago, during a speech at Software Freedom Day in Boston, Richard Stallman has, at least in my book, crossed a line that I thought he would never cross.
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RE: Traitor
by azior on Thu 24th Sep 2009 16:02 UTC in reply to "Traitor"
azior
Member since:
2009-09-24

So RMS's claim is that Miguel De Icaza was once a great hero to the Free Software movement, but now is working against it.


QFT

Not sure though if I completely agree with RMS, but he has also been the first to see actions or opinions that could undermine the freedoms he aspires.

The Mono debate is an example: I believe RMS's opinion was the following: Mono itself is a great open source tool to work with C#, but the language is controlled by Microsoft. So why use Mono for your FOSS-project?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Traitor
by WereCatf on Thu 24th Sep 2009 16:20 in reply to "RE: Traitor"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

The Mono debate is an example: I believe RMS's opinion was the following: Mono itself is a great open source tool to work with C#, but the language is controlled by Microsoft. So why use Mono for your FOSS-project?

The answer is very very simple: it's a matter of taste. Some people just happen to like coding in C# and they should be allowed to do that.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Traitor
by theosib on Thu 24th Sep 2009 19:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Traitor"
theosib Member since:
2006-03-02

Fine. Use C#. But don't use Mono or .Net. It's one thing to use a language because you like it. It's another to become dependent on runtime libraries that Microsoft may claim control over at a later date.

There were similar problems with Java. The runtime wasn't free. That made "Free Software" written in Java kindof ambiguous (or just plain wrong, depending on who you ask).

As soon as Sun released Java as Free Software, this took away their potential to sue you for use of their technology in a way they didn't like. So then it became okay (and meaningful) to write Free Software in Java.

We don't have that with .Net. Microsoft WILL screw you at some point, when it is to their greatest advantage. They can't claim copyright over Mono, but they damn sure will try to abuse patent rights.

For those who REALLY want to use C#, we should have a GCC front-end for it. You could use the language (the basic syntax), but you'd have to use a different, incompatbile set of system libraries. So be it.

Reply Parent Score: 3