Linked by David Adams on Mon 12th Oct 2009 17:11 UTC, submitted by Moulinneuf
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Bad news for Cloud Computing boosters. A massive screw-up on the part of the Microsoft subsidiary that runs the Sidekick service has resulted in all data stored on the service's servers being lost. Data stored locally on the Sidekick devices is still intact, and T-Mobile will be figuring out a way to facilitate the upload of that local data onto the servers at some point. It's a hard lesson to learn when we rely on someone else to safeguard our precious data. I'm afraid this will be the nail in the coffin for "Pink," the Microsoft mobile device hardware project reported to be based on Sidekick tech.
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atcurtis
Member since:
2007-04-03

The problem is simple really...

People mistake a high-availability solution as a backup solution.

RAID/Cluster/Cloud != backup.

The problem arises when some software bug deletes the data - your so-called backup is immediately deleted too.

Backups should be taken frequently and the most distinguishing feature of a backup: It is offline storage.

Reply Score: 3

npcomplete Member since:
2009-08-21

The problem is simple really...

People mistake a high-availability solution as a backup solution.

RAID/Cluster/Cloud != backup.

The problem arises when some software bug deletes the data - your so-called backup is immediately deleted too.

Backups should be taken frequently and the most distinguishing feature of a backup: It is offline storage.

A lot of people say that but's that's not really the case. The more frequently you perform your backups, the more it approaches RAID, especially if you want to be safe and backup all changes. After all, losing a single days' work or even a couple hours of work can still be just as devastating.

Suppose your backup strategy is a simple sync. Well, a frequent backup will also be affected by whatever destroyed your data in the original. Suppose you say you won't delete files. Ok. But your originals can still be destroyed by zeroing out files or by user/app level corruption (intentional or not like a bug). And again, your backup will be affected especially if it's a frequent backup.

I suppose you can mitigate this by having multiple/rotated backup copies or a versioned backup scheme, or snapshots but that adds a large strain on storage costs and space.

Edited 2009-10-13 21:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1