Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Oct 2009 12:06 UTC, submitted by ebasconp
OpenBSD As mentioned in the release announcement: "Many people have received their 4.6 CDs in the mail by now, and we really don't want them to be without the full package repository. We are pleased to announce the official release of OpenBSD 4.6. This is our 26th release on CD-ROM (and 27th via FTP). We remain proud of OpenBSD's record of more than ten years with only two remote holes in the default install." I really want news like this on the front page, but sadly, the long list of improvements makes no sense to me - I don't know what's important and what isn't. If someone can provide a nice readable summary of the most important improvements, I'll include it to the item and place it on the front page. There we are.
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OpenBSD: When Linux is too easy(tm)
by kragil on Mon 19th Oct 2009 11:20 UTC
kragil
Member since:
2006-01-04

Well, the mail server is more secure and network routing has been improved quite a bit. Those are the major "new features".

Refinements all over and a few "newer" version of some package. For exmaple X ( OpenBSD uses http://xenocara.org/ ) Others are still quite old (KDE 3.5.10)

But when you look at what the Linux distros add in 6 months the list is pretty pathetic (IMNSHO).

Reply Score: 1

sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

But when you look at what the Linux distros add in 6 months the list is pretty pathetic (IMNSHO).


Pretty much of all things added to Linux are useless to me and to many other people out there who use it. So that's no argument. Of course, it doesn't prevent me from running Linux as my main desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 6

foldingstock Member since:
2008-10-30

But when you look at what the Linux distros add in 6 months the list is pretty pathetic (IMNSHO).


OpenBSD doesn't focus on adding as many new features as possible. It is a system written by developers, for developers. They include features they need and spend a lot of effort on code quality and security.

If you consider how small the OpenBSD development team is, as well as the amount of time spent on quality and security, the new features in OpenBSD 4.6 are not "pathetic."

The Linux community uses a number of tools that the OpenBSD team develops. You should have a little more respect for the hard work of these developers.

No one is forcing or begging you to use OpenBSD. If it doesn't offer what you want in an operating system, don't use it.

Reply Parent Score: 11

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

OpenBSD doesn't focus on adding as many new features as possible. It is a system written by developers, for developers. They include features they need and spend a lot of effort on code quality and security.


As a developer, I'd like to emphasize that I like OpenBSD's high quality of documentation. In opposite to most Linusi, the BSDs pay as much attentioj to proper documentation as to features they add. Manpages (very important!), FAQs and Handbooks are not left to be implemented by the users.

The Linux community uses a number of tools that the OpenBSD team develops. You should have a little more respect for the hard work of these developers.


Personally, I say "thank you" to them nearly every day - for providing such excellent software that keeps my systems running and saves me lots of trouble.

Reply Parent Score: 3

strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20

But when you look at what the Linux distros add in 6 months the list is pretty pathetic (IMNSHO).


Heh.

If you really tried, you could see the irony here since many people consider it a problem that Linux distros just keep adding and adding every 6 months. It is also pretty pathetic that someone here at OSNews is actually seriously comparing adding and software development.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Francis Kuntz Member since:
2006-09-23

But when you look at what the Linux distros add in 6 months the list is pretty pathetic (IMNSHO).


Yes, and Linus Torvalds told us the result.

"We're getting bloated, yes it's a problem," Torvalds said, "I'd love to say we have a plan. I mean, sometimes it's a bit sad and we're definitely not the streamlined hyper-efficient kernel that I had envisioned 15 years ago. The kernel is huge and bloated, and our icache footprint is scary. I mean, there is no question about that. And whenever we add a new feature, it only gets worse."

Reply Parent Score: 7

kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

He also said that it is unacceptable, but also unavoidable.

AND in the Floss Weekly interview he said that the whole comment was blown out of proportion and that Linux is at least not a "fat ugly pig that should have been shot 15 years ago"

That is what he thinks about other OS kernels.

Edited 2009-10-19 18:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Actually the things in a base install can be easier then Linux, because they build the whole operating system, much more integrated. Linux distributions, take things more from different places.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Actually the things in a base install can be easier then Linux, because they build the whole operating system, much more integrated. Linux distributions, take things more from different places.


I may point this out: In opposite to the various Linux distributions, BSD systems like OpenBSD or FreeBSD consist of "a core operating system" maintaned by a development group, and "everything else", such as third-party software that has been ported to the specific platform and made available as sources or precompiled packages. That's why BSD always has a consistent OS that is fully functional, even if no other ostware is installed. You can easily run "rm -rf /usr/local" and get rid of all the extra stuff, and your system will still boot. The OS is well structured (see "man hier") and gives you a solid base of tools you can rely on. There's no arbitrary choice like "we put this in the OS, and this, but not this". Finally, this high quality standardisation keeps a high grade of compatibility to other UNIX operating systems, especially the commercial ones.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Have you ever really used the system? Takes time to learn but it time well spent.

Package System is incredibly easy to use and has flavors for each package so you don't have to install unnecessary dependencies. Ports system is incredibly easy to use.

I can do Play Music, Watch Video, Use Skype, Browse the web, program etc etc etc. With no problems.

There isn't any pretty GUI wizards or any other fluff that gets in the way ... using the man pages properly and a bit of reading will let you configure the system correctly for whatever you wish to use it for.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

I used to run it a few years ago. As a desktop it sucked.

I wanted to try the new version, but it isn't even installing in Virtualbox.

Reply Parent Score: 1

gfx1 Member since:
2006-01-20

I don't want to read man pages anymore to configure stuff.
Linux (xubuntu) is finally clever enough to figure out everything itself.
Tried pc-bsd recently and it couldn't even find the cdrom it started from during the install proces.

Reply Parent Score: 0