Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 2nd Nov 2009 23:59 UTC
Windows Windows 7 has been out and about for little over a week now, and as it turns out, Microsoft's new baby is doing relatively well. That is, according to the figures by NetApplications: Windows 7 already reached the 3% mark this weekend, and is already closing in on the 4% mark.
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Good for Microsoft, BAD for consumers
by apexwm on Wed 4th Nov 2009 19:21 UTC in reply to "There is no debate..."
apexwm
Member since:
2009-08-28

Microsoft locks in its customers to keep them, and forces them to continue down the upgrade path that they pave. Sure, it's very clever marketing and planning on their part. However, it's NOT good for customers that are trying to run a business and are forced to get their wallet out time and time again and pay their dues to Microsoft.

I abandoned that ship years ago and use Linux. I can run my personal small business and focus on our business. We don't have to upgrade anything unless we want to, and we don't pay ANY fees.

http://members.apex-internet.com/sa/windowslinux" http://member...

Reply Parent Score: 1

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Microsoft locks in its customers to keep them, and forces them to continue down the upgrade path that they pave. Sure, it's very clever marketing and planning on their part. However, it's NOT good for customers that are trying to run a business and are forced to get their wallet out time and time again and pay their dues to Microsoft. I abandoned that ship years ago and use Linux. I can run my personal small business and focus on our business. We don't have to upgrade anything unless we want to, and we don't pay ANY fees. http://members.apex-internet.com/sa/windowslinux


You might want to reconsider your argument. You say that Microsoft "locks-in" customers; then, you proceed to say that you moved to Linux. The fact that you were able to move to Linux completely obliterates your argument.

Nobody forces you to upgrade. Ever. Software doesn't rot. If you have a legacy need, lock it down and run one of many fine virtualization environments (some free) that are available. Done.

Edited 2009-11-04 23:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

You might want to reconsider your argument. You say that Microsoft "locks-in" customers; then, you proceed to say that you moved to Linux. The fact that you were able to move to Linux completely obliterates your argument.


That is not true for several reasons, but the point that really hurts you is that I can put together my own machines. I buy cases, motherboards, graphics cards, RAM and blank hard disks. I download Linux liveCD .iso files, and burn bootable CDROMS. From there I can put together excellent-performance Linux machines at very low costs, and I can use them.

The problem is that most people have no chance to do the same. They must buy their computers from a retail outlet. Where a move to Linux is entirely feasible for me, it is not for the majority of people simply because it is not offered to them (presented to them) as an option.

Nobody forces you to upgrade. Ever. Software doesn't rot. If you have a legacy need, lock it down and run one of many fine virtualization environments (some free) that are available. Done.


Windows software does rot. The registry gets unmanageable after a while as it fills with cruft.

However, your point is basically OK. What you say is not wrong. It is however far more sensible, as a society, for us simply to store our data in an open, well documented, platform-independant, future-proof format that can be deconstructed and used by any future systems. That way we can just archive the data, and we don't have to keep the platforms in order to manipulate the data.

Reply Parent Score: 1