Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 13th Nov 2009 17:01 UTC
Google TechCrunch's Michael Arrington is claiming Google's Chrome OS will debut next week - but his story does have an odd ring to it. He goes on and on about how driver support will be shoddy, but that makes no sense - isn't Chome OS supposed to be built on Linux? The only way I can see initial driver support to be shoddy is when Chrome OS has its own, custom graphical layer, instead of using X. However, were that to be the case, I'm sure Google would at least support some NVIDIA, ATI, and Intel chipsets. In any case, it's a rumour - do with it as you please.
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RE[5]: Android
by james_parker on Mon 16th Nov 2009 22:09 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Android"
james_parker
Member since:
2005-06-29

Right. ChromeOS then means ChromeObscureSystem? ChromeObviousSentence? Linux is just a kernel not a complete OS. I assume Chrome provides the rest that makes Linux boot up and some standard services and facilities that sit on top of the kernel and provide interaction with the user. Kernel + Shell is the OS.


"ChromeOS" is the marketing name/trademark. Linux, which consists of a kernel, an API/ABI, a DDI (Device Driver Interface), and a bootstrapping mechanism.

Shells, if any, are simply applications that execute on the OS. Many operating systems run quite nicely without a shell being one of the available applications (e.g. embedded operating systems).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Android
by sbenitezb on Mon 16th Nov 2009 23:07 in reply to "RE[5]: Android"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

But you are confusing the kernel with the whole set. You assume the kernel only is all that's needed to launch applications, manage windows, etc. The kernel doesn't do that. ChromeOS IS an operating system. Like Debian, like Red Hat, like Ubuntu, etc. It doesn't matter what kernel it uses or what user-space applications and services, desktop environment or window manager it provides. And by shell I meant any user interface, text or GUI, that allows a user to communicate with the device or whatever thing the kernel manages.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Android
by james_parker on Mon 16th Nov 2009 23:21 in reply to "RE[6]: Android"
james_parker Member since:
2005-06-29

Again, look at the Syllabus of an Operating Systems course (geared toward a CS major), or a textbook on Operating Systems.

Here are links to three of the most commonly used textbooks (these links allow viewing the Table of Contents):

http://www.amazon.com/Operating-System-Concepts-Abraham-Silberschat...
http://www.amazon.com/Operating-Systems-Internals-Design-Principles...
http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Operating-Systems-Andrew-Tanenbaum/dp/...

None of them include discussions of windowing, shells, and any and all other libraries, frameworks, and applications that are often provided by vendors to increase the utility of an operating system. These are not part of the Operating System itself, however.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Android
by nt_jerkface on Tue 17th Nov 2009 08:34 in reply to "RE[5]: Android"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Linux is a kernel.

ChromeOS is an OS.

The kernel is the core of the operating system and the first software abstraction layer that allows access to the hardware.

So I'm really not sure where you are going with this.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Android
by WereCatf on Tue 17th Nov 2009 09:34 in reply to "RE[6]: Android"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Linux is a kernel.

ChromeOS is an OS.


I personally see them both as OSes. When the Linux kernel is used as-is as the only software layer and the application runs directly on top of it then it is an OS. When Linux kernel is used as a foundation for a much larger standardized software, API and ABI selection then it is not an OS as of itself but rather only a part of one.

Feel free to disagree, but for the sake of any discussion it'd be nice to explain why you disagree and not just say you do.

Reply Parent Score: 2