Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 22:58 UTC
Google Google has just launched its very own public Domain Name System resolver, with which the company hopes to speed up internet traffic. The search giant claims its DNS is more secure (through protection against cache poisoning attacks) and faster than others.
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Not fast to remote parts of the world
by siimo on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 23:15 UTC
siimo
Member since:
2006-06-22

I am getting a ping time of about 180ms to these Google DNS servers from New Zealand. It is probably hitting their US or Japan servers. Would be lower if they had DNS in Australia but doesn't appear to be the case.

Get 10ms to my ISP DNS servers. It is unlikely their lookups would be slower than going across the Pacific ocean to Google.

Reply Score: 4

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Get 10ms to my ISP DNS servers. It is unlikely their lookups would be slower than going across the Pacific ocean to Google.


Yeah, it's kind of an odd idea, this one. Their implementation might be good, but an ISP also offers a caching name server, as near to my computer as can possibly be achieved... I don't see how Google can offer any real advantage over that...

Reply Parent Score: 2

chrish Member since:
2005-07-14

I don't know how NZ ISPs behave, but the ones most people use in North America are slimy, paint-huffing crack addicts.

AFAIK "all" of the big ISPs in Canada and the US are hijacking failed DNS requests to redirect you to their own services instead of just telling you it's a bad host name.

My ISP (Teksavvy) doesn't, but they're a rather small player compared to Rogers and Bell.

Reply Parent Score: 2

siimo Member since:
2006-06-22

I think almost all ISPs here don't hijack DNS. You simply get the "Page not found" error in your web browser.

Reply Parent Score: 2

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

AFAIK "all" of the big ISPs in Canada and the US are hijacking failed DNS requests to redirect you to their own services instead of just telling you it's a bad host name.


Rogers Cable certainly does, I haven't seen that from Aliant/Bell yet (just a matter of time, though, since the two appear to be on a relay-race-to-the-bottom). They have some sort of partnership with Yahoo, so failed lookups redirect you to a Rogers-branded Yahoo search page.

For my money, the most annoying thing is that it breaks Firefox's ability to keep invalid URLs out of the auto-complete history. Fortunately, it's fairly simple to "fix" by adding the URL of the search page to your hosts file, pointed at 127.0.0.1 (the old-school ad blocking trick).

Reply Parent Score: 2