Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 6th Jan 2010 20:01 UTC
Internet Explorer It would appear that Microsoft will finally take standards compliance in the browser world seriously, after dragging its feet for years. Back in November 2009, the Redmond giant already revealed that Internet Explorer 9 would come with CSS3 and HTML5 support, and now the cup runneth over, as Microsoft has requested to join the W3C's SVG Working Group.
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RE[7]: Comment by Kroc
by nt_jerkface on Thu 7th Jan 2010 04:45 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Kroc"
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

Perhaps you haven't used another browser then. JS on IE is orders of magnitude slower than JS on Gecko or Webkit based browsers.


Perhaps you didn't read the part about me using Chrome 90% of the time.

You also didn't read about my opinion on synthetic benchmarks.

A 1000x increase in a framerate doesn't matter much if the user can't tell the difference between 50 and 5000fps.

Google docs is as heavy as they get when it comes to AJAX and I used it in IE8 just fine. Did it load as fast as Chrome? No, but it loaded about as fast as MS Word which should make you question reaching conclusions from benchmarks without a proper context.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by Kroc
by StaubSaugerNZ on Thu 7th Jan 2010 06:46 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Kroc"
StaubSaugerNZ Member since:
2007-07-13

"Perhaps you haven't used another browser then. JS on IE is orders of magnitude slower than JS on Gecko or Webkit based browsers.


Perhaps you didn't read the part about me using Chrome 90% of the time.

You also didn't read about my opinion on synthetic benchmarks.

A 1000x increase in a framerate doesn't matter much if the user can't tell the difference between 50 and 5000fps.

Google docs is as heavy as they get when it comes to AJAX and I used it in IE8 just fine. Did it load as fast as Chrome? No, but it loaded about as fast as MS Word which should make you question reaching conclusions from benchmarks without a proper context.
"

I wrote a site (using Google Web Toolkit) with a large amount of tabular data and the performance of IE is noticeably slower. IE8 is better than its ancestors but still painful compared to Firefox or Chrome. For some sites IE is just too slow with Javascript.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by Kroc
by abraxas on Thu 7th Jan 2010 14:54 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Kroc"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

You also didn't read about my opinion on synthetic benchmarks.


This isn't about synthetic benchmarks. It's about real-world use. Seven tenths of a second is the threshold at which most people notice lag. JS heavy sites can get annoying very quickly when using IE.

Reply Parent Score: 2