Linked by Kroc Camen on Fri 8th Jan 2010 21:25 UTC, submitted by kap1
3D News, GL, DirectX Independent game company Wolfire write why you should use OpenGL and not DirectX. The article goes over a brief history and the standard and Microsoft's tactics with DirectX, and what this really means for developers. DirectX keeps games on Windows, and that's not a good thing--over half of the users for one of their games are not on Windows. The fact is that Microsoft will have you believe that DirectX is the better choice for gaming, but OpenGL has always had the best features, first, and in a consistent and transparent way. I'm particularly interested in the last couple of paragraphs where WebGL is mentioned because this is gaining traction with browser vendors and it would go directly against Microsoft's grain for them to implement it in IE--as they should. Will we see yet another generation of Microsoft ignoring the standards and going their own way with a 'WebDirectX'?
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RE[3]: Times 2
by f0dder on Sat 9th Jan 2010 11:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Times 2"
f0dder
Member since:
2009-08-05

3. "if you use OpenGL, you get faster and more powerful graphics features than DirectX 11, and you get them on all versions of Windows, Mac and Linux, as well as the PS3, Wii, PSP, DS, and iPhone."

I call bullshit one that one - the OpenGL committee is very slow, and thus you've had to depend on vendor extensions to get the latest features... how portable is *that*?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Times 2
by Laurence on Sat 9th Jan 2010 11:37 in reply to "RE[3]: Times 2"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


I call bullshit one that one - the OpenGL committee is very slow, and thus you've had to depend on vendor extensions to get the latest features... how portable is *that*?


You can check to see what extensions a platform supports - so it's not as big issue in terms of hardware portability as you make out.

And if you're migrating from one OS to another, you'd need to rewrite chunks of non-OpenGL code anyway (eg the iPhone will have different APIs to XP)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Times 2
by KAMiKAZOW on Sat 9th Jan 2010 20:58 in reply to "RE[3]: Times 2"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

I call bullshit one that one - the OpenGL committee is very slow

OpenGL 3 is updated far more frequently than DirectX.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Times 2
by KAMiKAZOW on Sun 10th Jan 2010 12:31 in reply to "RE[4]: Times 2"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

Who voted my down?
OpenGL 3.0 - July 11, 2008
OpenGL 3.1 - May 28, 2009
OpenGL 3.2 - August 3, 2009

DirectX 10 - November 30, 2006
Direct3D 10.1 - February 4, 2008
DirectX 11 - October 22, 2009

Last three DX updates took MS 3 years.
OpenGL 3 was updated 3 times in 1 year.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Times 2
by kaiwai on Mon 11th Jan 2010 00:48 in reply to "RE[4]: Times 2"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

OpenGL 3 is updated far more frequently than DirectX.


Which has only been a recently phenomenon; prior to those dates, the improvements coming out of working committee were as slow as the W3C. 2.0 Didn't come out until September 2004, 2.1 didn't come out until July 2006.

I've said it once, and I'll say it again, what is required is a complete API framework like what Microsoft provides. They not only need OpenGL, they also need OpenAL and OpenIN (a framework for input devices that needs to be started - doesn't exist yet) that comes under the rubric 'OpenDA' (Open Direct Access) where consolidated standards are released on a yearly basis which includes all of the above. Put everything under one roof and create a good developer experience with great development tools. If you do that, then the developers will come.

Edited 2010-01-11 00:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3