Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jan 2010 19:45 UTC
Apple In what everybody already saw coming for weeks (months) now, Apple has just unveiled its latest product, a tablet called the iPad. Basically a bigger version of the iPhone, Steve Jobs presented the iPad during a press event in San Francisco. The most interesting news? It's powered by... An Apple processor, called the A4. The most shocking news? The price.
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RE: Hmm
by ameasures on Wed 27th Jan 2010 20:38 UTC in reply to "Hmm"
ameasures
Member since:
2006-01-09


On the other hand, however, it's more app store lock-in and Apple gatekeeping...

As a long time open source advocate I respect your view point.

On the other hand: my heart delights at the absence of need for anti-virus, anti-malware and all the other paraphenalia that distract me from productive activities and make 64bit megaputers perform just like the 16bit micros of 20 years ago.

The AppStore gatekeeping is a particular value proposition for that vast proportion of the population who aren't ubergeeks and do just want something that just works. There will be other value propositions around as part of the market scene - so get over it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Hmm
by WorknMan on Wed 27th Jan 2010 21:12 in reply to "RE: Hmm"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

The AppStore gatekeeping is a particular value proposition for that vast proportion of the population who aren't ubergeeks and do just want something that just works. There will be other value propositions around as part of the market scene - so get over it.


On the other hand, it also means you can't get any apps without Apple's stamp of approval, which really sucks, and severely cripples the device, IMHO. The right thing to do would be to make it closed by default, but also make it so that people who wanted to could open it up, but make that process JUST hard enough so that Joe Sixpack couldn't do it accidentally and hurt himself.

Plus, many people (including me) find iTunes to be particularly repulsive. I wouldn't install that piece of sh*t unless I absolutely had to, and then it would only go in a VM. If the app store(s) just worked in a web browser, with a tiny sync app that ran when you needed to transfer stuff, it would not be so bad.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Hmm
by darknexus on Wed 27th Jan 2010 22:03 in reply to "RE: Hmm"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

And if Apple's reasons were to keep out malware, I wouldn't object. Their reasons, however, are often politically motivated or else designed to stamp out any competition to their own apps. Anyone want to bet that iWork will be the only office sweet you can get on the iPad? Not that iWork is bad as I actually do like the Mac version, but my point is I shouldn't be locked into it if I don't want to be. I want to choose which wordprocessor I use, is that such a bad thing? Further, Apple has already proven they can't keep out all malware, remember the phishing app that got through a while back? I don't necessarily dislike the idea of gatekeeping, I just don't like the way Apple does it. And my opinion can be expressed here too, so get over it. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Hmm
by tf123 on Thu 28th Jan 2010 05:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Hmm"
tf123 Member since:
2010-01-28

Considering QuickOffice ( http://www.quickoffice.com/quickoffice_iphone/ ) already exists on the iPhone and can run unmodified on the iPad, I'll take that bet.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Say what?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 28th Jan 2010 04:37 in reply to "RE: Hmm"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

When was the last time you got a virus on OSX? Possible? yes. Probable: no. That was neither a driving force for the closed environment, nor a real benefit.

Reply Parent Score: 3