Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Jan 2010 16:26 UTC
Microsoft Microsoft presented the results for its second quarter of the 2010 fiscal year yesterday, which ended on December 29 2009. As it turns out, thanks to sales of Windows 7, Microsoft experienced a record quarter, which is especially welcome after the previous two lacklustre ones. It sold 60 million Windows 7 licenses during this record quarter.
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Devi1903
Member since:
2009-11-05

OEMs aren't the problem. This meme needs to die. The problem is simply that Linux, on a technical level, simply can't compete with Windows and OS X. I don't care how good it is in the server room, or how many developer tools it has, for everything else, it lags Windows and OS X by miles.


Can't compete ona technical level!? Oh please really!?

Please flood us with examples of where linux lags so we can shoot them down!

Reply Parent Score: -1

siride Member since:
2006-01-02

X11, for one, which is even going to lose its room at FOSDEM next year because nobody cares about it, despite it being a critical component of the desktop. Still can't get OpenGL 2.0 on an 8 year old graphics card, for example. Performance is still choppy and way behind Windows on the same hardware.

But aside from that, the DEs are lacking in coherence and it is very easy to run into bugs, crashes, incomplete functionality and just plain lack of polish. I gave up on ever using KDE 4 because it continued to fail to produce.

Priorities are also in the wrong place. KDE devs keep pushing for KHTML when it is so far behind the times, it's not even funny. Instead, they could be working on WebKit, but that's just not "free" enough for them, or whatever the problem is.

And, while the rest of the world gets work done and can watch whatever media they want and run whatever software they want, Linux users and devs will at least have their "freedom", whatever value that actually has (certainly isn't technical).

While the rest of the world gets work done,

Reply Parent Score: 2

Devi1903 Member since:
2009-11-05

Performance is still choppy and way behind Windows on the same hardware.


I would run ubuntu over vista any day for performance! And have u tried running windows 7 on 512mb ram. Please!

I gave up on ever using KDE 4 because it continued to fail to produce.


Havn't used kde for years cause it headed in the wrong direction. But you can hardly judge linux on kde alone! Gnome is a perfectly good alternative.

And, while the rest of the world gets work done and can watch whatever media they want


Cannot see the problem with media on linux at all. Did u forget to install the gui after installing ubuntu server edition? I use ubuntu for my entire household entertainment and works just as good as any other alternative in my mind.

Reply Parent Score: 0

SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

X11, for one, which is even going to lose its room at FOSDEM next year because nobody cares about it, despite it being a critical component of the desktop. Still can't get OpenGL 2.0 on an 8 year old graphics card, for example. Performance is still choppy and way behind Windows on the same hardware.

But aside from that, the DEs are lacking in coherence and it is very easy to run into bugs, crashes, incomplete functionality and just plain lack of polish. I gave up on ever using KDE 4 because it continued to fail to produce.

Priorities are also in the wrong place. KDE devs keep pushing for KHTML when it is so far behind the times, it's not even funny. Instead, they could be working on WebKit, but that's just not "free" enough for them, or whatever the problem is.

And, while the rest of the world gets work done and can watch whatever media they want and run whatever software they want, Linux users and devs will at least have their "freedom", whatever value that actually has (certainly isn't technical).

While the rest of the world gets work done,


Lacking in coherence you say? Canonical are using the new KDE notification spec, both desktops use dbus and use various freedesktop specs. Qt provides native GTK theming which unifies the desktops' look.

What can you run on an 8 year old graphics card anyway?(Geforce4 series)

Yes I do work in Linux/KDE4 all the time. It's my main OS and desktop for graphic design, video editing, music, messaging, browsing and other common tasks. I get lots of work done thank you very much.

I don't worry about the "Linux is not ready for the desktop" people. I just get work done in Linux and leave them to think we can't to proper work.

Reply Parent Score: 5

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

X11, for one, which is even going to lose its room at FOSDEM next year because nobody cares about it, despite it being a critical component of the desktop. Still can't get OpenGL 2.0 on an 8 year old graphics card, for example. Performance is still choppy and way behind Windows on the same hardware.

But aside from that, the DEs are lacking in coherence and it is very easy to run into bugs, crashes, incomplete functionality and just plain lack of polish. I gave up on ever using KDE 4 because it continued to fail to produce.

Priorities are also in the wrong place. KDE devs keep pushing for KHTML when it is so far behind the times, it's not even funny. Instead, they could be working on WebKit, but that's just not "free" enough for them, or whatever the problem is.

And, while the rest of the world gets work done and can watch whatever media they want and run whatever software they want, Linux users and devs will at least have their "freedom", whatever value that actually has (certainly isn't technical).

While the rest of the world gets work done,


It's debatable whether Linux distros are suitable for home desktops. For business desktops, though, they've been ready for years now. And it's mainly due to all the nifty network features in X11.

There's a huge market around desktop management tools for Windows primarily because Windows itself is not suited to large, networked, business deployments.

Should one really need a completely separate server just to run the desktop management tools, over and above the shared network server? Should one really need 17 different GUIs to manage everything? Should one have a completely separate server just to manage all the software licenses?

These are all things that Unix solved years ago, and that Linux inherited over time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Priorities are also in the wrong place. KDE devs keep pushing for KHTML when it is so far behind the times, it's not even funny. Instead, they could be working on WebKit, but that's just not "free" enough for them, or whatever the problem is.


KDE is committed to supporting KHTML through the 4.x release cycle, so dropping it is not an option. Besides, while I'll admit that KHTML may not be cutting edge, it is still very usable, a fact made more impressive considering that it is developed by a handful of people. It's worth remembering that the whole reason KHTML was chosen by Apple (versus Gecko) was the code base. It's no surprise that WebKit passed it by once Apple, and then others, poured resources into it.

It's still worth remembering where WebKit came from, though.

Having said that, you may want to give this a read, because clearly not all the KDE developers are pushing KTHML because it's "free"(?), or whatever.

http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2010/01/key-quest-webkit.html

Reply Parent Score: 4