Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Mar 2010 20:21 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Internet Explorer "With the latest releases of Opera, Google Chrome and Firefox continuing to push the boundaries of the web, the once-dominant Internet Explorer is looking less and less relevant every day. But we should expect Microsoft to go on the offensive at its upcoming MIX 2010 developer conference in Las Vegas, where, it has been speculated, the company will demonstrate the first beta builds of Internet Explorer 9 and possibly offer a preview release of the browser to developers. Several clues point to the possibility that the next version of IE will include broad support for HTML5 elements, vector graphics and emerging CSS standards. If Microsoft plays its cards right in Vegas, IE 9 could be the release that helps IE get its groove back in the web browser game."
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RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by lemur2 on Thu 4th Mar 2010 03:04 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

With that much money, it's never too late.


Microsoft don't make money from IE through sales of IE. IE's only real purpose (from a MS financial POV) is to try to lock users in, to make it so that in order to surf the full extent of the web one must use IE. Silverlight is an extension of this ... an attempt to make rich web content available only to users of Microsoft's platform.

To this extent, incompatibility, and non-compliance with web standards are normal fetaures of IE.

It hasn't worked. IE's incompatibility and non-compliance with web standards is driving people away from IE. Even worse, from a Microsoft POV, is that once people wean themselves from IE, they realise that there are alternatives to Microsoft software, and those people find (often to their surprise) that the alternatives are cheaper, have better license terms, faster, more secure and less restrictive than Microsoft's offerings.

People find that they don't need to use Microsoft software at all. They escape from this kind of burden:
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9164438/Microsoft_s_security...
http://ostatic.com/blog/improve-internet-health-with-a-microsoft-ta...

(as if there isn't enough Microsoft tax already!)

From a Microsoft POV, that is a disaster for Microsoft (from a user POV it is an enormous relief).

Edited 2010-03-04 03:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by flanque on Thu 4th Mar 2010 03:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

I was talking about the company as a whole and yes I still believe it's not an issue for them to fix the problems and catch up - they just have to want to.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by r_a_trip on Thu 4th Mar 2010 11:24 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

...they just have to want to.

Which they won't. HTML5 is designed to make a standard webpage much more conducive to offer RIA capabilities. HTML5 is a level playing field standard and it could be a direct threat to MS's fat client computing model.

MS wants the world locked in to Silverlight, tied to the win32 API. Windows is the millstone around MS's neck.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by Nelson on Thu 4th Mar 2010 04:21 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Silverlight is an extension of this ... an attempt to make rich web content available only to users of Microsoft's platform.


Yes, that mean Silverlight vendor lock-in which only works on one operating syste-- wait a minute.. no it doesn't.

From someone who gets paid to develop Silverlight, and is able to compile once, and run it across Windows, OSX, and Linux with nearly identical performance, your claims are complete and utter bullshit.

No proposed webstandard, or combination of any webstandard comes even close to providing anywhere near the productivity that I am able to achieve using Silverlight. On many browsers across many platforms. Nothing.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by MamiyaOtaru on Thu 4th Mar 2010 04:53 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

too bad I'll never get anything out of any of your sites then

(windows user)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by lemur2 on Thu 4th Mar 2010 08:55 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Silverlight is an extension of this ... an attempt to make rich web content available only to users of Microsoft's platform.


Yes, that mean Silverlight vendor lock-in which only works on one operating syste-- wait a minute.. no it doesn't.

From someone who gets paid to develop Silverlight, and is able to compile once, and run it across Windows, OSX, and Linux with nearly identical performance, your claims are complete and utter bullshit.

No proposed webstandard, or combination of any webstandard comes even close to providing anywhere near the productivity that I am able to achieve using Silverlight. On many browsers across many platforms. Nothing.
"

Oooooh, tetchy tetchy.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/20/silverlight_4_windows_bias/

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/09/11/20/2314220/New-Microsoft-Silve...

So much for cross-platform. Microsoft didn't even wait for Silverlight to get a proper foothold (i.e. finish the "embrace") before they started their "extend" phase on this one.

That would be a significant "oopsie", I believe.

Edited 2010-03-04 08:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2