Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Mar 2010 16:54 UTC
Internet Explorer As predicted, more Microsoft news from MIX10, and this is some big stuff: Internet Explorer 9. As we all know, Microsoft really let Internet Explorer rot away, allowing competitors to make much better browsers with better standards compliance and performance. With IE9, Microsoft is aiming to not just close that gap - but to overtake the competition. Update: Ars has an in-depth look at the platform preview.
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lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

if the video is crap quality that it won't matter whether you can get the bandwidth is equal between Theora and h264, if the video is of lower quality then it won't bring the views thus won't get the traffic thus the advertisers won't back your website


This is a bit confused. Either codec can be made to deliver video of better or worse quality. It is actaully the quality:bandwidth ratio that is a single parameter. At this time, for the same bandwidth, h264 delivers slightly better subjective quality than Theora. The difference is barely perceptible, most people can't tell the difference in blind tests.

Experimental builds of Theora right now are apparently achieveing appreciably better quality than h264 at the same bandwidth. By the time IE9 is out, this currently-experimental build of Theora is likely to be released.

Edited 2010-03-17 02:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

This is a bit confused. Either codec can be made to deliver video of better or worse quality. It is actaully the quality:bandwidth ratio that is a single parameter. At this time, for the same bandwidth, h264 delivers slightly better subjective quality than Theora. The difference is barely perceptible, most people can't tell the difference in blind tests.

Experimental builds of Theora right now are apparently achieveing appreciably better quality than h264 at the same bandwidth. By the time IE9 is out, this currently-experimental build of Theora is likely to be released.


1) How is it confusing if you have two videos being compressed; both of them set at 1mbps on the encoder; both of them use the same bandwidth but one will have a higher quality than the other.

2) Experimental builds - thats very nice but guess what? the majority of the videos encoded and sitting on servers is either in an old On2 Technologies format or in H264; imagine the millions of videos on YouTube - is it really productive to convert all the videos on there at the risk of quality loss (transcoding)? the processing power used up? then there I'm sure many more other considerations that need to be taken into account. It isn't a matter of open and shut.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

1) How is it confusing if you have two videos being compressed; both of them set at 1mbps on the encoder; both of them use the same bandwidth but one will have a higher quality than the other.


I wasn't confused, it was your original text that was confusing. We agree, what one needs to do is either: (1) to set the same bandwith and compare quality, or (2)to set the same quality and compare bandwidth used. The latter is impractical compared to the former, so we use the first method.

2) Experimental builds - thats very nice but guess what? the majority of the videos encoded and sitting on servers is either in an old On2 Technologies format or in H264; imagine the millions of videos on YouTube - is it really productive to convert all the videos on there at the risk of quality loss (transcoding)? the processing power used up? then there I'm sure many more other considerations that need to be taken into account. It isn't a matter of open and shut.


A video website worth its salt would of course encode from uncompressed video, or at least transcode from higher-resolution compressed video if the uncompressed video data is unavailable.

As for quality and processing power required ... Dailymotion have done it:

http://openvideo.dailymotion.com

http://www.fsf.org/blogs/community/dailymotion-theora/?searchterm=d...
With video streaming site Dailymotion offering the free Ogg Theora video format, FSF urges other video sites to follow.

Dailymotion has transcoded over 300,000 videos to the free Ogg Theora format, which will play without the need for plugins in the latest free software web browsers.


If Dailymotion can do it, where's the risk?

As far as the non-free nature of h264 is concerned, and hence its utter unsuitability for use as a codec for the public access web, there is no question at all. This IS a matter of open and shut, if you will pardon my intentional pun.

Edited 2010-03-17 05:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2