Linked by Preston5 on Sat 27th Mar 2010 11:46 UTC
Multimedia, AV In January, we had read the various arguments regarding Mozilla's decision not to get an H.264 license. This has generated a lot of discussion about the future of video on the web. With Youtube, Dailymotion, Hulu and Vimeo having adopted H.264 for HD video, Mozilla and Opera should use the codecs installed on a user's system to determine what the browser can play, rather than force other vendors to adopt Ogg. Refusing to support a superior codec would be a disservice to your users in years to come. Why hold back the majority of your users because 2% of your users are on niche OSes?
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I'd go for Theora..
by andih on Sat 27th Mar 2010 14:37 UTC
andih
Member since:
2010-03-27

usually i agree more or less with the authors writing on Osnews, this time I don't.

I don't believe that theora is as bad as author of article sais it is. There are big companies using a lot of money trying to make people believe just that.. My experiences from the format are pretty good, and I like the idea of a free standard that's open to everybody. and that everybody can help improving.

Making H264 the new web standard will just brew a lot more pirates and I'm sure that the world will not benefit from it, while a few big companies getting paid the royalties will.

I am a fan of open standards and most people that are into security are aware that "security through obscurity" is not the way to go making a secure web standard. Also bug usually stay around for a much longer time than on open standards. I'm not a fan of adobe at all, but I'd rather depend on adobe than on apple!! Adobe have been lazy fixing bugs, but apple are evil b*st*rds.. Nobody should feel safe when apple is in charge..:p

Just about everything on my home computer is open source and I think it should be a human right to be able to use the internet and my own computer without having to pay "taxes" and depend on greedy and lazy companies thinking only of money and power, and not the best for the users..

Reply Score: 7

RE: I'd go for Theora..
by Kroc on Sat 27th Mar 2010 14:48 in reply to "I'd go for Theora.."
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

This comment is just to note that the article was kindly written by OSnews user Preston5, and not the staffers like Thom, David or myself who have written about H.264/Theora in the past.

We always encourage that if users have a problem with our articles, to sound off in the comments, or even better—write their own article and put it to the community to discuss; such as in this case.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: I'd go for Theora..
by Preston5 on Sat 27th Mar 2010 16:05 in reply to "I'd go for Theora.."
Preston5 Member since:
2010-03-19

Making H264 the new web standard will just brew a lot more pirates and I'm sure that the world will not benefit from it, while a few big companies getting paid the royalties will.

I never said that it should be the new standard, but honestly, if IE9+ supported Theora, do you think videophiles will start using it in their video files? Btw, have you noticed that the container format used by video pirates, MKV, is now gaining more hardware support than Ogg? As much as you may not agree, large companies watch what the pirates are using, and make it convenient for them. If the pirates were using Vorbis instead of MP3, I'm sure there would have been more Vorbis players on the market.

I think it should be a human right to be able to use the internet and my own computer without having to pay "taxes" and depend on greedy and lazy companies thinking only of money and power, and not the best for the users.

Do you count your ISP as one of the greedy companies that only think of the money they collect from you every month? As a human right, one can argue that it should be free.

No man is an island, and as much as you may disagree with them, big companies have as much place in this world as the little ones. If the herd follows the monopoly, they do so out of convenience. It is up to you to show them that going open source isn't as much trouble as the big companies are portraying. As it stands, Theora is less convenient that H.264.

Edited 2010-03-27 16:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: I'd go for Theora..
by darknexus on Sat 27th Mar 2010 17:21 in reply to "RE: I'd go for Theora.."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

You do know that mkv is a *container* and not a *codec* right? Virtually any codec, video or audio, can go into an mkv container file. Guess what codec typically ends up in a patent-free mkv container? H.264, funnily enough. The audio, however, is very often Vorbis.
Do not fudge the issue by referring to the ogg container when you're actually referring to the codecs. The ogg container, imho, is crap for anything more complex than a Vorbis audio track. Matroska, however, is well-suited to just about any use you can think of and you can literally put just about anything in them.

Reply Parent Score: 1