Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Apr 2010 13:10 UTC
Linux We all know Synaptics, the company that seems to produce just about every touchpad you can get your hands fingers on. Their touchpads also do a lot of multitouch and gesture stuff, but up until now, their set of gestures, the Synaptics Gesture Suite, was only available on Windows. Luckily, they've ported it over to Linux, and made it available for OEMs building Linux laptops.
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RE[4]: Comment by spinnekopje
by siride on Tue 20th Apr 2010 14:53 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by spinnekopje"
siride
Member since:
2006-01-02

Linux can claim to support X thousand devices, but the reality is that a lot of mainstream hardware doesn't work with Linux, or doesn't work very well, or is hard to configure (even if it eventually can work as good as on Windows). Graphics drivers, power management, printer and camera support, specialized audio devices, etc. are still behind on Linux. Nobody cares that it supports ancient specialized harddrive 382. That doesn't count on the desktop. And no desktop user cares that it supports this or that server hardware or specialized cell-phone processors. Remember, we're talking about Linux on the desktop here.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by spinnekopje
by spiderman on Tue 20th Apr 2010 15:14 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by spinnekopje"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

Remember, we're talking about Linux on the desktop here.

Well, you are. Most people who use Linux don't use it on the desktop and desktop users have Windows if they don't like how Linux works on the Desktop so I don't know why you are whining about it. I'm running it on the desktop but I chose to. Most computer are sold with Windows. In many country it is almost impossible to get a desktop computer without Windows. You can't install Linux by mistake. Windows is not that hard to use anyway these days. The long serials you had to enter are a thing of the past and the license is not that expensive. Get a proper firewall, use your brain when surfing the web and you should be safe from virii. Why don't you just use it on your desktop?

Edited 2010-04-20 15:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by spinnekopje
by Laurence on Tue 20th Apr 2010 15:16 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by spinnekopje"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Linux can claim to support X thousand devices, but the reality is that a lot of mainstream hardware doesn't work with Linux, or doesn't work very well, or is hard to configure (even if it eventually can work as good as on Windows).


As I've stated a dozen times now, 4 out of 5 systems I build Linux works /very/ well and /without/ hacking.

(1)Graphics drivers, (2)power management, (3)printer and (4)camera support, (5)specialized audio devices, etc.

1/ I play 3D accelerated games in Linux and have desktop compositing (on all of the systems I've built in the last 5 years) that puts even Win7 to shame.

2/ Fans work ok but suspend doesn't properly. I never use suspend in Windows anyway as I find even in Windows that it's buggy with some hardware.

3/ Linux supports CUPS so if a printer supports OS X then it supports Linux. Thus I've only found one printer that I couldn't use in Linux and that printer wouldn't even run in some XP installs and any version of Vista, let alone Linux.

4/ all of my web cams have worked in Linux. My camcorder has worked in Linux too.

5/ I'm a producer and DJ so use professional audio hardware. All of which has worked in Linux. I will grant you that Linux's non-standardised mess of audio stacks makes for professional audio work a nightmare compared to Windows and OS X - but that's less than 1% of overall computer users and the hardware still works perfectly within Linux even if the software stacks are fscked.


are still behind on Linux. Nobody cares that it supports ancient specialized harddrive 382. That doesn't count on the desktop.

Linux supports plenty of new hardware before Windows (USB3 for example).


And no desktop user cares that it supports this or that server hardware or specialized cell-phone processors. Remember, we're talking about Linux on the desktop here.

And I was when I stated that the vast majority of desktop hardware works without additional downloads and installs - unlike Windows.


I get sick and tired of hearing anti-OS FUD. Yeah, you like Windows, I get it. But just because Windows does some jobs well it doesn't mean that other OSs are automatically sh*t. Sure, Linux isn't perfect (far from it in fact), but the examples you've posted have been complete BS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by spinnekopje
by siride on Tue 20th Apr 2010 15:51 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by spinnekopje"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

I don't *like* Windows and I don't like Linux either. They are both giant piles of shit, each in their own craptacular way. I also don't like people who think that OSS with it's scattershot approach to development actually produces a working desktop comparable with Windows and Mac OS X (such as they are...).

I've run Linux for many years, as have friends of mine, my sister and her boyfriend. And every single one of us has had issue after issue. You see Linux forums polluted with questions about how to get basic hardware working that you claim always works out of the box. I see graphics drivers that still can't compete with what Windows has. I see a lack of a clean, unified API for programs to target. I see fragmentation, constant churn and project wars. It just doesn't work. That there is a workable desktop solution at all for Linux is not because of the bazaar model, but in spite of it, thanks, mainly, to the work of a few folks with strong personality (Linus, Aaron Seigo, Keith Packard, etc.).

Reply Parent Score: 2