Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 6th May 2010 21:48 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Canonical has explained why it has licensed H264. As it turns out, the license does not cover the distribution as a whole - since Ubuntu is entirely Free software, the license cannot be included. Canonical has licensed H264 so that it can offer it as an option to OEMs, just as it does with Flash, Fluendo, and some others. Since this is just an option for OEMs, it does not mean that every pre-installed Ubuntu system comes with the H264 license - it depends on whether or not your OEM decided to include it (good luck finding that out). And people actually promote this complicated spaghetti licensing situation.
Thread beginning with comment 423105
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Where is the....
by strcpy on Fri 7th May 2010 09:05 UTC
strcpy
Member since:
2009-05-20

Where is the Linux's people's army?

You know, those who have kicked and screamed about The Evil Apple all this time, defended The One True Freedom and Freedomz Codecs.

Must be disappointing. But of course it is the nature of Freedom that you are Free to twist the words so that Ubuntu is still Freedom although it is not quite Freedom and Free. We must reevaluate subclause 3.1812.3 in the third Freedom Clause of the Freedom License.

Edited 2010-05-07 09:06 UTC

Reply Score: -4

RE: Where is the....
by Neolander on Fri 7th May 2010 09:39 in reply to "Where is the...."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

...or use something else than Ubuntu, claiming that it's proprietary technology since it's fully owned by an individual which can suddenly change windows button position in order to create a bad clone of the system tray on the right side of windows (right side is a mandatory requirement. People must close windows while trying to open the file menu with a touchpad/touchscreen, it improves their productivity), without caring a rat's ass about what the developers and designers have to say.

Works pretty well as long as there are other nice distros around ;) And when there's no more, you have to write a new free operating system and start again until it gets cursed with nonsense. A bit tiring, actually, but this is the price you pay for preferring free OSs over Windows and Mac OS X.

Sometimes I wonder why I do so. Then I have to boot on the XP partition for some reason. Get silly popups everywhere. Endure a DNS bug that leads to waiting 30 seconds each time I ask for a page in a web browser. Have an antivirus running in the background that slows down every single HDD access. An ugly "bozo the clown" theme that can't be changed without violating the EULA. Insanely slow global performance. And then I remember about the activation procedure. I remember that I paid for all of this. And I say "oh, well...".

Current free OSs are not ready for the average joe. They just can't prevent breaking things everyday and hence require some knowledge and patience. However, they clearly have some potential, so who knows...

Edited 2010-05-07 09:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2