Linked by Kroc Camen on Sun 9th May 2010 12:34 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "Dear Ubuntu, for the last couple years life has been good. Every time I've shown you to a friend or family member, they've compared you to what they're familiar with--Windows XP or Vista, mostly--and by comparison you've looked brilliant. Yeah, your ugly brown color scheme was a bit off-putting at first, but once people saw how secure, simple, and reliable you were, the response was almost universally positive. But recently, things have changed ..."
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Ubuntu isn't perfect
by Tuishimi on Sun 9th May 2010 22:02 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

...but it works for most people out of the box. 10.04 worked better for me out of the box than did Fedora 12 (well, sort of better - it detected my simple wireless card when fedora did not for some reason. It was also kind enough to remind me that I could install a proprietary driver for my nvidia card). The only thing that Both Fedora and Ubuntu are missing is DRM support from media mogels. I'd like to stream my Netflix movies via moonlight but cannot (as an example). Also gaming support which is, again, the choice of the game companies - not any fault with linux that I know of.

In the end I think it comes down to drivers being written for linux that are free and open, but created by the hardware companies. If linux had that I don't see how it could be stopped.

Anyway...

Windows 7 is a vast improvement and it does deserve some accolades. There have been memory management tweaks, scheduler tweaks, API tweaks, work done to continue the separation of the kernel from some of the library dependencies (or other way around), locking has changed... The UI is (opinion of course) much improved (tho' I agree with another poster and am not 100% fond of the blurring, and wish it was more configurable) functionally.

All in all it is solid.

Linux in general is very solid. Mac OS X is solid.

This article seems to rail against the corporatism of Canonical more than anything else.

Reply Score: 3