Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 12th May 2010 15:07 UTC
Games "Valve Corporation has today rolled out their Steam Mac OS X client to the general public and confirmed something we have been reporting for two years: the Steam content delivery platform and Source Engine are coming to Linux. This news is coming days after we discovered proof in Steam's Mac OS X Client of Linux support and subsequently found more Linux references and even the unreleased Steam Linux client. The day has finally come and Linux gamers around the world have a reason to rejoice, as this is the biggest news for the Linux gaming community that sees very few tier-one titles." This means Linux users can finally enjoy two of the best games in recent years: Left 4 Dead and Left 4 Dead 2. BOOMER!
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nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26


Are you seriously claiming that Apple's success is due to having a stable hardware API?

Where did I claim that?

I pointed out that there is a successful Unix desktop that has a stable ABI. I said nothing about the reasons behind its success, just that one exists.

Reply Parent Score: 3

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13


Where did I claim that?

I pointed out that there is a successful Unix desktop that has a stable ABI. I said nothing about the reasons behind its success, just that one exists.


If all you wanted to do was prove that with enough money a stable API could succeed, you'd be much better off using Windows in your example.

If you were trying to prove that it was necessary to succeed, then I think your own example actually disproved that, given that OSX has less hardware support than linux does.

And if it didn't have any bearing at all, then why even bring it up?

Reply Parent Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

ABI, not API. And as much as myself and nt_jerkface are typically on opposite sides of most issues, he's right about this. An os needs both a stable ABI and stable API to be attractive for hardware (and even some software) makers to even consider it. How much hardware supported by the OS itself is irrelevant if the manufacturers can easily and quickly write drivers that they can be reasonably sure will continue to work within the os/kernel's current major version. As much as I like Linux, it seriously fails at this. The ABI and API both change with each kernel revision. Drivers compiled for 2.6.32 will not work with 2.6.33 without a recompile. That is not the kind of crap hardware companies want to deal with. And then there's the software side of it, each distro has different versions of glibc, different libraries installed by default, different distro-specific patches for those libs, etc. It can seriously be a deployment nightmare for precompiled software. And yes, I know it's all awesome from an open source perspective, but it's horrible for those on the other side.

Reply Parent Score: 3