Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 15th May 2010 19:23 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes There's one complaint we here at OSNews get thrown in our faces quite often: what's up with the lack of, you know, operating system news on OSNews? Why so much mobile phone news? Why so much talk of H264, HTML5, and Flash? Where's the juicy news on tomorrow's operating systems? Since it's weekend, I might as well explain why things are the way they are. Hint: it has nothing to do with a lack of willingness.
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RE: It's still OSnews
by Morgan on Sun 16th May 2010 01:32 UTC in reply to "It's still OSnews"
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

My phone is where about half of my internet activity occurs anymore.


I think that says a whole lot about the situation. Back in the old days, the internet was a means to an end for us geeks and hackers. We used it as a tool to communicate about and download/upload bits and pieces of our pet OS and app projects. For example, I spent hours on end exploring the inner workings of the BeOS shell and file system features; I didn't even have a working network card in my BeOS machine for a few months. Once I did, I only used the 'net to catch up on email and download more software to play with in my favorite OS.

These days, it is reversed: The computer, its OS and apps are the means to reach the internet, which has become the end. Today, nobody really cares what their computer runs, as long as it gives them a browser. I know Thom hates the term, but today it's all about the cloud and how to reach it, and more and more of the "apps" we use live there.

I miss the days when the journey was many times more rewarding than the destination.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: It's still OSnews
by kaiwai on Sun 16th May 2010 04:58 in reply to "RE: It's still OSnews"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think that says a whole lot about the situation. Back in the old days, the internet was a means to an end for us geeks and hackers. We used it as a tool to communicate about and download/upload bits and pieces of our pet OS and app projects. For example, I spent hours on end exploring the inner workings of the BeOS shell and file system features; I didn't even have a working network card in my BeOS machine for a few months. Once I did, I only used the 'net to catch up on email and download more software to play with in my favorite OS.

These days, it is reversed: The computer, its OS and apps are the means to reach the internet, which has become the end. Today, nobody really cares what their computer runs, as long as it gives them a browser. I know Thom hates the term, but today it's all about the cloud and how to reach it, and more and more of the "apps" we use live there.

I miss the days when the journey was many times more rewarding than the destination.


You've hit the nail right on the head - my next door neighbours are in the market of getting a laptop. Their main purpose for the laptop? catching up with friends on email, going on trade me, surfing the internet and maybe some typing for work.

I wouldn't say that the apps reside on the internet as so far as visualising Microsoft Office on the internet but rather that the websites have become applications in themselves which sit side by side in importance to Microsoft Office. Being able to run Microsoft Office for some people is as important as being able to access Facebook.The 'need' for mail application by many people is waining as the online facility are as good as having a locally running application - it was only a couple of years ago I was using Mail to access gmail but now I am just logged into gmail and use it like an offline mail application.

There is still, however, a place for locally stored applications, and people will still be picky about their computers, what runs on them and what is bundled, just like the did years ago. But the change is due to a number of factors - it'll be interesting to see in 5 years time where things turn out at.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: It's still OSnews
by mlankton on Sun 16th May 2010 15:25 in reply to "RE: It's still OSnews"
mlankton Member since:
2009-06-11

I see your point, but here is a different view:

Our phones are now handheld computers. I don't want all my computer use done on my phone, but much of it is easier on the phone than on the computer, because I can do it anywhere I am.

If I like operating systems on computer hardware, it stands to reason that I would appreciate a good phone os. I played with Android for a while and thought that it might turn into not just an alternative to the iPhone, but an iPhone killer. Then I got my hands on webOS.

I used OPENSTEP for years, and gave up a lot for the sake of a superior interface. I feel the same way about webOS. It's just better than the other phone operating systems. It's not perfect, but where it's good it's great. I enjoy using it, and again, I am sacrificing much for a superior interface. I hope that HP throws the money at webOS to allow it to become what it deserves to be.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: It's still OSnews
by ricegf on Mon 17th May 2010 11:18 in reply to "RE[2]: It's still OSnews"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

I agree about the elegant webOS UI. I hope HP makes a go of it.

I have the same enthusiasm for Nokia's Maemo. It's just a regular Debian distribution, with a phone app among the usual suspects. I've linked a bluetooth keyboard to my N800, actually, and programmed in Idle exactly as I would on a desktop; I quickly forgot it was a tablet (buggers that the old keyboard wouldn't link to my N900 ;) ).

And I can't help but love a phone that ships with xterm on the default menu. :-D

Maemo 6 is now Meego 1, which will be an rpm distribution. Fortunately I'm not religious in that sense. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 1