Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Jun 2010 10:15 UTC, submitted by kragil
Linux Employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have ported Sun's/Oracle's ZFS natively to Linux. Linux already had a ZFS port in userspace via FUSE, since license incompatibilities between the CDDL and GPL prevent ZFS from becoming part of the Linux kernel. This project solves the licensing issue by distributing ZFS as a separate kernel module users will have to download and build for themselves.
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RE[2]: brtfs
by Tuxie on Mon 7th Jun 2010 23:08 UTC in reply to "RE: brtfs"
Tuxie
Member since:
2009-04-22

One of the ZFS features I think is coolest is L2ARC which let you put a fast SSD as a read/write-cache in front of a pool of slower mechanical disks. The blocks you use most frequently will have a copy on the SSD for quick access. IIRC the cache currently doesn't survive a reboot though (it will start caching from scratch again), but they are working on fixing that.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: brtfs
by phoenix on Mon 7th Jun 2010 23:24 in reply to "RE[2]: brtfs"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Yes, cache vdevs are very handy. And they are absolutely essential for dedupe to work correctly/quickly.

Even a lowly USB flash stick can be used as a cache vdev ... so long as the read speed of the USB stack/driver/port/disk is faster than the read speed of the harddrive.

I use 4 GB USB sticks at home to speed up my pokey 120 GB SATA (non-NCQ, 1.5 GB/s) drives.

There's even support for using SSDs for write caching (log vdevs), although it's a lot harder to find SSDs that are optimised for writes (SLC-based) that include onboard power (supercap, for example) and that honour cache flush/sync requests.

Reply Parent Score: 2