Linked by Howard Fosdick on Tue 15th Jun 2010 21:06 UTC
Linux All of us who use computers create a problem we rarely consider. How do we dispose of them? This is no small concern. Estimates put the number of personal computers in use world-wide today at about one billion. The average lifespan of a personal computer is only two to five years. We can expect a tidal wave of computers ready for disposal shortly, and this number will only increase. And as if that isn't challenge enough, there are already several hundred million computers out-of-service, sitting in attics and basements and garages, awaiting disposal.
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lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

" In other words, I have never experienced the frequently heard myth: "What you save in money with Linux, you pay in time." In fact, it's the other way around, I save time AND money with Linux.
Because when something goes wrong in Linux it can take a lot longer to fix. "

Never so in my experience. I put Linux on machines that have parts that support Linux, just as you would install Windows only on machines that support it. For example, you wouldn't even try to put Windows XP on an ARM smartbook. So, treat Linux the same, and simply don't install Linux on a machine with closed-Windows-driver-only hardware, and you are good to go.

Never had XP require me to track down drivers and then compile them for a common wireless card.


Neither have I for Linux on a machine with hardware that could run Linux from the outset.

A refurbishment effort such as the one being discussed in this topic would simply toss hardware such as closed-XP-driver-only wireless cards, because such hardware is no longer supported. By anything. One would get a replacement wireless card as a reclaimable spare part from a machine that was otherise going to be scrapped.

Never had XP break working hardware with a system update.


Likewise with Linux, for a machine that supported it.

Until a Linux distro can be relied upon to update the system without breaking applications or hardware it isn't ready for the typical consumer.


So, it was ready about six years ago then (for hardware that supported Linux)?

I have said before that crunchbang is a great distro for old computers but I really think it is a bad idea to put Linux on charity computers if there is an XP key available.


Very, very bad idea to put XP on machines meant for ordinary consumers.

XP is no longer supported by Microsoft, so vulnerabilities will no longer be fixed. Even in the past when they were supposed to be being fixed:
http://gorumors.com/crunchies/malware-infection-rate-worldwide/
http://www.sunbeltsoftware.com/About/Security-News/?title=Researche...

Oh my. These showstopper security issues are in addition to the "planned obsolesence" and slowdown-over-time issues of XP surrounding the registry.

Edited 2010-06-16 05:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

So, treat Linux the same, and simply don't install Linux on a machine with closed-Windows-driver-only hardware, and you are good to go.


It isn't about me or you, it's about the typical consumer. Should people that get these machines be expected to buy Linux compatible hardware?


Likewise with Linux, for a machine that supported it.


This article is about putting Linux on random machines. But more importantly they are installing a variant of Ubuntu which in the past has broken Dell machines that were pre-installed with Linux. For a consumer OS to break a working wireless card or dump the user to a command line after an update is unacceptable.


XP is no longer supported by Microsoft, so vulnerabilities will no longer be fixed.


XP is supported to at least 2014 and I have no doubt they will continue to provide security updates past that date.

Reply Parent Score: 2