Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 25th Jun 2010 22:56 UTC, submitted by fran
Google While it's currently cool to love Google's Android and hate Apple's iOS, especially because of the massive difference in philosophy (open vs. closed), Google still retains a fair amount of control over the Android Market. This was demonstrated this week Google employed its remote kill switch for two Android Market applications, removing them from all Android devices on which they were installed.
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EULA
by fraterf93 on Sat 26th Jun 2010 17:36 UTC
fraterf93
Member since:
2009-04-23

Why is it acceptable for Google to have a license agreement that limits user control over a device, but wrong for Apple's Mac OS X to have one? Explain.

Reply Score: 1

RE: EULA
by leech on Sun 27th Jun 2010 04:54 in reply to "EULA"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Why is it acceptable for Google to have a license agreement that limits user control over a device, but wrong for Apple's Mac OS X to have one? Explain.


It's the nature of EULAs to be not acceptable, even though you're forced to agree / accept it. All the EULAs that I have ever seen basically say;

"You are only licensing this software, you don't own it, if we feel like breaking it so it no longer works, tough crap for you. Thank you for paying us."

That's also why EULAs aren't generally considered legally binding, especially since the majority of them pop up as soon as you start to install the software, and because of the way software authenticates nowadays (mostly CD KEY based) as soon as you open the box, you can't return it. So even if you don't agree to the EULA, you have already spent the money on it and can't return it. So you would be stuck with software that you couldn't use.

Retarded is really the term for it. Gone are the days when you can buy software and actually have it 'belong' to you.

At least in the closed source world. At least with open source projects, even if they want you to pay for them, they will provide source code so you can make your own modifications.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: EULA
by Tuxie on Mon 28th Jun 2010 08:37 in reply to "EULA"
Tuxie Member since:
2009-04-22

With Android you can choose to go to another "App Store" and even start your own. With iPhone you're stuck with Apple's one.

Reply Parent Score: 1