Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 26th Jul 2010 17:48 UTC
Legal So, there I am enjoying a nice Gilmore Girls episode after a long day's work, and Engadget's iPhone application brings the good news: the US Library of Congress has added a DMCA exemption for jailbreaking or rooting mobile phones! This is a major blow to Apple, who actively tried to keep jailbreaking a criminal offence, and a major win for everyone who believes that the phone you buy is actually yours, and not the manufacturer's.
Thread beginning with comment 434473
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Who cares?
by polaris20 on Mon 26th Jul 2010 18:28 UTC
polaris20
Member since:
2005-07-06

Honestly, who cares? The people that would have done it "illegally" would have done so anyway, and it's unlikely Apple would have ever gone after them.

The people that never would have done it before likely still won't. I don't really see this as a "big blow to Apple".

I personally don't see people saying "wow, I was not going to jailbreak my iPhone because I was afraid Apple would be knocking at my door, but now I can!!"

I've got a rooted Droid that Motorola obviously doesn't like that way, but I've yet to hear anyone knocking at my door.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Who cares?
by danieldk on Mon 26th Jul 2010 18:35 in reply to "Who cares? "
danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

Honestly, who cares? The people that would have done it "illegally" would have done so anyway, and it's unlikely Apple would have ever gone after them.


Don't forget that someone should also care for the people who publish the information and software to actually do a jailbreak.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Who cares?
by elektrik on Mon 26th Jul 2010 18:44 in reply to "Who cares? "
elektrik Member since:
2006-04-18

Honestly, who cares? The people that would have done it "illegally" would have done so anyway, and it's unlikely Apple would have ever gone after them.

The people that never would have done it before likely still won't. I don't really see this as a "big blow to Apple".

I personally don't see people saying "wow, I was not going to jailbreak my iPhone because I was afraid Apple would be knocking at my door, but now I can!!"

I've got a rooted Droid that Motorola obviously doesn't like that way, but I've yet to hear anyone knocking at my door.


you're right-this decision *still* hasn't influenced me to buy an iPhone :p

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Who cares?
by Praxis on Mon 26th Jul 2010 18:54 in reply to "Who cares? "
Praxis Member since:
2009-09-17

Honestly, who cares? The people that would have done it "illegally" would have done so anyway, and it's unlikely Apple would have ever gone after them.


Apple has gone after them though, http://www.techspot.com/news/33855-apple-wants-to-squelch-rogue-iph... and I remember another one where the target was a wiki or something with jailbreak instructions.

This moves the jailbreak community from a legal grey area where they have to keep a low profile to avoid apples wrath, to a legal community that can operate without risk and even lets people try to make money off products around the jailbreak ecosystem (though I doubt we would ever be talking about a lot of money here).

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Who cares?
by polaris20 on Tue 27th Jul 2010 12:18 in reply to "RE: Who cares? "
polaris20 Member since:
2005-07-06

Excellent point; I didn't think about it from the standpoint of those that were sharing the information. I stand corrected. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Who cares?
by shmerl on Mon 26th Jul 2010 18:55 in reply to "Who cares? "
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

One should care, since in general companies build their policies around the legal climate. The more relevant and fare laws are, the less room is there for Apple and the like to pressure users with their power hungry policies.

Edited 2010-07-26 18:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Who cares?
by orestes on Mon 26th Jul 2010 20:19 in reply to "Who cares? "
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

I do. It's a step in the rarely seen "sane" direction for US IP law.

Reply Parent Score: 6