Linked by David Adams on Tue 27th Jul 2010 07:35 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Linux Some people hate the idea of adding proprietary software to their desktop Linux. For these people, there are Linux distributions such as gNewSense that use only free software. For the rest of us, who use distributions such as Fedora, openSUSE and Ubuntu, there are times we either want to, or feel forced to, add proprietary programs such as Adobe Flash or Skype or the ability to play proprietary audio and video formats such as MP3 or commercial DVDs to your Linux desktop. Here's how to do it.
Thread beginning with comment 434588
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Shooting yourself in the foot.
by theTSF on Tue 27th Jul 2010 15:57 UTC in reply to "Shooting yourself in the foot."
theTSF
Member since:
2005-09-27

So you are saying that Linux is of such poor quality that the only reason people use it, is access to free Open Source Software...

Perhaps I am missing some sarcasm. As an avid Mac, Windows, and Linux user. There are valid reasons to use each OS over the other ones.

Most Linux distributions usually have a rather robust set of command line tools at your beck and call... Far more then OS X. And windows still thinks DOS is an acceptable command line, and power shell is not supported well enough for normal use. Sure you can get most of these tools for the platforms but that is a lot of work and effort... And some may cause some crazy things happen to your normal installs as well dirty up your filesystems. I love using Linux for appliance and server based solutions. Low overhead easy programming and setup, and lets you do things that OS X and WIndows says no I don't think you should do that... No matter how bad you need it.

Windows (7) is a good Middle ground OS. A decent UI to do medium advanced things easily, much easier then with Linux. Also if you have compatibility issues going in Windows fixes them. It is quite good at running desktop applications. And runs much nicer then X11 for Linux. It is well designed for CAD work and Visual Studios is really a nice IDE.

OS X is good for productivity. Its UI is clean and efficient and predictable. Emails, Browsing the Web, Writing Documents, and graphics editing it is quite useful at those jobs. Also with enough Unix command line tools for good connectivity with Linux servers and Windows as well.

Sure they all have their faults too... But really I actually Like all 3 OS's and they all really have a place for their usage

Reply Parent Score: 3

westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

So you are saying that Linux is of such poor quality that the only reason people use it, is access to free Open Source Software... [i][/i]

What I'm saying is that, for all practical purposes, Linux runs a sub-set of the apps available to the OSX and Windows user.

That is not a good place to be when you hold a bare 1% share of the desktop - and the iOS threatens to become an even bigger presence on the web.

That is not a good place to be when you are all but invisible in OEM system sales. The kit builder - the technical hobbysist - does not drive adoption.

Applications drive adoption. Applications drive development. The technology of the OS is secondary - always.

That is why the Amigas of this world fall by the wayside.

The OSX and Windows user rates zero for ideological purity and political correctness.

He cannot be moved on that basis.

---and the truth is that you need him. 86% of the funding for The Moz Foundation comes from AdSense. From the mass consumer market.

Reply Parent Score: 1

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


What I'm saying is that, for all practical purposes, Linux runs a sub-set of the apps available to the OSX and Windows user.


This is an incorrect assumption on your part. Not every open source application is ported to Windows or let alone MacOS X. And if there is a port, it may be "second grade" solution like KDE/Cygwin on Windows, or all the crap on macports/fink/whatever the mac people use these days.


That is not a good place to be when you are all but invisible in OEM system sales. The kit builder - the technical hobbysist - does not drive adoption.

But mobile devices do.

Reply Parent Score: 2

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

What I'm saying is that, for all practical purposes, Linux runs a sub-set of the apps available to the OSX and Windows user.

I'm listening to Alice Cooper right now in Winamp. I also just used Mr QuestionMan and eMule earlier, and recently toyed around with the various versions of Battle for Wesnoth to see what the changes between versions were (Windows installers sure beat compiling manually...). All in openSUSE 11.3. ;)

Sure it's not without its flaws (and I occasionally do run into them), but Wine is getting quite good... I just wish I didn't have to use it.

I only wish the wine devs would have chose to name their program after a better beverage, like beer (the quality types, not Bud/Miller/Coors/etc.) or something... wine sucks. LOL.

Edited 2010-07-28 05:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

That is not a good place to be when you hold a bare 1% share of the desktop


The 1% figure for the desktop is a myth.

http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp

Heading towards 5%.

It is 30% of netbooks (worldwide), apparently, which is a figure that the Windows world desperately doesn't want anyone to know.

In other spaces, such as mobiles, servers, embedded in devices and even supercomputers, Linux dominates.

FTA: "For these Linuxes, all you need to do to add Adobe Acrobat Reader to your desktop is just run the distribution's default application installation program and in a minute or two, you'll be viewing PDF files."

Pfft. On my Kubuntu 10.04 Linux install I can view PDF files out-of-the-box without installing anything, using a far better application than Adobe Acrobat Reader bloatware.

http://okular.kde.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okular
It supports the following file formats[4]:

Portable Document Format (PDF) with the Poppler backend
PostScript with the libgs backend (Okular 0.6/KDE 4.0) / libspectre backend (Okular >= 0.7/KDE >= 4.1)
Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) with the libTIFF backend
Microsoft Compiled HTML Help (CHM) with the libCHM backend
DjVu with the DjVuLibre backend
Device independent file format (DVI)
XML Paper Specification (XPS)
OpenDocument format (ODF)
FictionBook
ComicBook
Plucker
EPUB
Mobipocket
Various image formats.


If I wasn't using KDE, perhaps I would be using Evince instead of Okular:
http://projects.gnome.org/evince/
Evince is not as capable as Okular, but it is serviceable enough.

I can't speak for GNOME, but my KDE4 Kubuntu 10.04 desktop default installation includes a "print to PDF" printer driver out of the box, and it includes an "export to PDF" toolbar button or menu command on OpenOffice.org Office suite applications and KOffice applications.

Why on earth would I be interested in installing inferior, closed-source Adobe software instead?

Reply Parent Score: 3

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


OS X is good for productivity. Its UI is clean and efficient and predictable. Emails, Browsing the Web, Writing Documents, and graphics editing it is quite useful at those jobs.


Read: it does a few things that are trivial on Windows anyway.

The real selling point of OSX is that it doesn't (yet) have all the malware scanners Windows & corporate IT forces on you, so it will end up working faster than Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sPAZbEAT Member since:
2009-07-17

I've used mostly windows. IMO, because it was the earliest target, experienced windows users are more aware of potential danger. it's like growing up in a war zone ;)
so i agree with you, in that if a user wants to feel carefree while "computing", os x seems the best among reasonably common oses. a common distro like -buntu is probably almost as good.
unfortunately none of these (os x, -buntu, windows) seem by default to resist the secondary level of attacks (on privacy).

Reply Parent Score: 1

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Windows (7) is a good Middle ground OS. A decent UI to do medium advanced things easily, much easier then with Linux. Also if you have compatibility issues going in Windows fixes them. It is quite good at running desktop applications. And runs much nicer then X11 for Linux. It is well designed for CAD work and Visual Studios is really a nice IDE.

I honestly thought the same... until last night, when my sister's friend asked me to "fix" her relatively new laptop which has Windows 7. To put it simply, it is the most f***ed Windows install I've seen in years. With all Microsoft has done since XP SP2 and Vista, it's clear it's not working. The machine has no restore discs, and the "recovery" partition doesn't allow a full factory restore, so it's gonna have to wait. Not that I would "trust" the "recovery" partition of an infected (infested?) machine anyway.

Yeah, Windows is easy... until its insecurity and its typical clueless user meet for a little walk on the Internet. Then, it becomes completely untrustworthy, slow, and an outright a pain in the ass to use, with popups everywhere and a useless half-year expired commercial anti-virus program that refuses to do anything besides send more money to actually be able to, eh, *use* it. Yeah, like anyone's gonna *trust* such a machine to not send that credit card info out while the system is infested and the AV refuses to do ANYTHING about it! [OK, yeah, I'm sure a lot of clueless people will do that... if they can figure out that their subscription has run out in the first place, that is.)

Ah, it's a good thing I left that OS a couple years ago. It's clear it still has a long, long way to go. Just had to vent; my old feelings toward the OS have resurfaced for a moment. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2