Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Aug 2010 22:00 UTC, submitted by JRepin
KDE KDE today celebrates its semi-annual release event, releasing new versions of the Plasma Desktop and Netbook workspaces, the KDE Development Platform and a large number of applications available in their 4.5.0 versions. In this release, the KDE team focused on stability and completeness of the desktop experience.
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RE[4]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 11th Aug 2010 06:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

Think about it for a moment ... KDE 4.0 was released a couple of years ago, for no cost, and the developers said it was a development version, and they solicited user feedback with it. Getting user feedback necessarily means getting users to try it. The earlier you get user feedback incorporated into the design, the better the eventual result is.

It seemed to me more like KDE 4.0 was supposed to be the "next big thing," but as its release drew closer and it became obvious they couldn't get it anywhere near ready by 4.0, they backtracked and tried to claim that 4.0 will really be primarily for testing and not of release quality. Then they started saying that there's a difference between "KDE 4" and "KDE 4.0," and that it should be "ready" for general use around 4.2 or 4.3. I think it's safe to say that by 4.3, it really was just about ready, but still... the beginnings of "KDE 4" were a nightmare; slow, buggy, featureless software with very bad communication from the KDE guys.

Well, user feedback they got, and now KDE SC 4.5 is arguably the best desktop available today, bar none.

It's damn good today, I agree, but I still run into frequent graphical glitches involving the pop-up tooltips on the taskbar and the pop-up Device Notifier applet. And I strongly disagree with considering it "arguably the best" desktop environment today. That's too subjective, and if you'd try it on a machine with under 512MB of RAM, you'd quickly find that most of the alternatives (and even KDE 3) would run circles around it. I'm not completely impressed with its performance.

I like how they "stole" the Aero Snap concept from Windows 7 though; that's one thing Microsoft actually got right for once, it works great, and it just makes sense. It's one of those things that makes you think, "why didn't they think of this before?" And I'm glad to see such a feature being added to a free desktop in such a relatively short amount of time. Aero Shake is useful too, but it looks like KDE hasn't added similar functionality yet (running KDE 4.4 in openSUSE 11.3).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by mgl.branco on Thu 12th Aug 2010 12:29 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
mgl.branco Member since:
2009-07-22

It seemed to me more like KDE 4.0 was supposed to be the "next big thing,"

No. Developers design a _concept_ that could actually be the next big thing and they openly shared their ideas with the community and put themselves on action. Media took those concepts as facts, as real progress, and promised the audience the next big thing. Then a few on the media overacted. They even used mockups from kde-look branistorm section as what would be expected to look like
KDE communicated their ideas poorly, ok, but media misread and overreacted.

Then they started saying that there's a difference between "KDE 4" and "KDE 4.0," and that it should be "ready" for general use around 4.2 or 4.3.

Read devs blogs again and start reading two years before 4.0 was released. It should come clear that KDE4 was used to identify the new series and not a specific release.

Reply Parent Score: 3