Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Aug 2010 19:14 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris Due to me not working for OSNews these past eight weeks, I've been a bit out of the loop, as I didn't really follow technology news. I did notice that a lot is going on in OpenSolaris land, and today, Oracle has outlined what it has planned for Solaris 11 - and according to some, the fears about OpenSolaris' future were justified.
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RE[2]: Not surprised...
by porcel on Thu 12th Aug 2010 12:25 UTC in reply to "RE: Not surprised..."
porcel
Member since:
2006-01-28

The only thing that one can take from you post is arrogance.

Bereft of any reasons why a company would bet its livelihood on a on operating system that they cannot fix or control in any meaningful way, the only thing you can add is a personal attack based on your presumed intellectual superiority.

I run a business, a successful one at that. And many of my clients come to me with exactly the same concerns that I have conveyed here. Not small businesses, by the way.

Wonder why Google, Nokia, or HP use Linux internally? Or Hertz or Avis and millions of other companies.

By the way, life is about hedging your bets. You may want to run Oracle, or may have to for some reason, but may prefer doing so on an OS over which you can have some control.

And Linux has greater industry support than Solaris from the likes of IBM, HP, Dell and every major hardware manufacturer or software vendor. The tides have turned, the ship has left. Proprietary Unix has no future.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Not surprised...
by flanque on Thu 12th Aug 2010 13:52 in reply to "RE[2]: Not surprised..."
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

Dell and HP are now offering Solaris x86:

http://www.goodgearguide.com.au/article/355052/dell_hp_resell_oracl...

The announcement "demonstrates Oracle's commitment to openness," company co-president Charles Phillips said in a statement. In addition, Solaris is simply in demand for use on multiple x86 server platforms, he added.

An HP executive put it another way. Many customers simply "have hardwired stacks of applications and infrastructure that can’t rapidly change," said Paul Miller, vice president, solutions and strategic alliances, enterprise servers, storage and networking, in a statement.

Users of Dell and HP x86 servers will be able to purchase Premier Support contracts from Oracle as a result of the agreement, and gain access to future updates.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Not surprised...
by Coxy on Thu 12th Aug 2010 14:48 in reply to "RE[2]: Not surprised..."
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

Nokia don't just use linux.

Nokia siemens are one of my employer's customers, 55K computers running windows, it's because they still use IE6 that we have to make everything we do work for it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Not surprised...
by Tuishimi on Thu 12th Aug 2010 16:01 in reply to "RE[2]: Not surprised..."
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

People were locked into DEC and IBM products because they worked very well and customer support was excellent. They wanted to be locked in. They had the development tools to create their own software and even tho' the mid to main frames were expensive, they could support many users on VTs or even XTs.

Companies make choices and often they will pay extra money for extra support and/or features that might not be found in open source products.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Not surprised...
by gnufreex on Fri 13th Aug 2010 08:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Not surprised..."
gnufreex Member since:
2010-05-06

That is BS. Nobody wants to be locked in, but sometimes companies will reluctantly chose lock in due to lack of better choice.

The thing is, Solaris now doesn't lot of things better than GNU/Linux, and year from now, it will be behind.

Other thing, Soalris 11 will have huge price tag and only way to get expertise is Oracle university, which is not exactly cheap.

On the other side, there are free distros like Ubuntu, CentOS and Debian GNU/Linux, and every kid can learn that and grow up by using it. Then, getting RHCE is walk in the park.

Solaris is sliding at inevitable death by obscurity.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Not surprised...
by nt_jerkface on Thu 12th Aug 2010 21:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Not surprised..."
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Bereft of any reasons why a company would bet its livelihood on a on operating system that they cannot fix or control in any meaningful way


He gave a reason:
Companies just need it to work.

Companies also buy photo copying machines and air conditioners that they cannot fix themselves. The vast majority of companies that run Linux don't work on the OS either. They pay a company like Red Hat and focus on their own business.


You may want to run Oracle, or may have to for some reason, but may prefer doing so on an OS over which you can have some control.


And what if there is a technical benefit when it is tied to Solaris on Sparc stacks? Just ignore any productivity gain and focus on a feature that most companies don't care about?

Reply Parent Score: 2