Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Sep 2010 19:14 UTC
Internet Explorer After several months and preview releases, Microsoft has finally lifted the curtain for the Windows Explorer 9 beta release. Internet Explorer 9 is Microsoft's attempt at not just catching up to the competition, but at actually surpassing them. Since enough sites will be focusing on just how many nanoseconds faster or slower the beta is compared to the competition, I'll talk a little about the new minimalist interface.
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Comment by orestes
by orestes on Wed 15th Sep 2010 21:12 UTC
orestes
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not sure I'd call the lack of tabs space a huge issue, but then again I'm not seeing the infatuation with having half a million tabs open in the first place.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by orestes
by Tuishimi on Wed 15th Sep 2010 21:39 in reply to "Comment by orestes"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

When developing and testing I often have more than 10 tabs open at a time. So the tab thing needs some work... I am hoping they might at least drop the tabs down a level. BUT... I allowed Live to install its accelerator and toolbar... takes up way too much space and I don't see a way, other than disabling it, to get rid of the toolbar. ;) If the toolbar would disappear when I clicked on another tab, that would be alright, but it doesn't go away... it's up there for life (again, as far as I can tell so far).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by orestes
by Neolander on Thu 16th Sep 2010 05:40 in reply to "Comment by orestes"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Why using lots of tabs ? A typical example for me is news websites. You open the home page, you wheel-click all news that are of interest for opening them as tabs in the background. Then you read each one, and close the tab thereafer. This way, by a look at your tab bar, you know what remains to be read, and once you close your last tab you know you're done. I find it more comfortable than going back and forth between content pages and the home page, personally.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by orestes
by smitty on Thu 16th Sep 2010 05:56 in reply to "RE: Comment by orestes"
smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

Why using lots of tabs ? A typical example for me is news websites. You open the home page, you wheel-click all news that are of interest for opening them as tabs in the background. Then you read each one, and close the tab thereafer. This way, by a look at your tab bar, you know what remains to be read, and once you close your last tab you know you're done. I find it more comfortable than going back and forth between content pages and the home page, personally.


Yeah, I have 3 uses for my many-tabs approach. The first is just what you said, opening up all interesting looking stories at once and going through them. Second, you can keep open quite a few comment threads, bug reports, and other stuff you want to keep an eye on for a while without fogetting. And third, and probably most wasteful, you can use them instead of bookmarks. So I've got the core sites i always visit permanently on the left side of my tabs, and firefox is set to remember them when it closes and automatically restore when i open. I suppose i could do the same by just placing them in a bookmark list, but i find it more convenient to just know they're always there and always positioned at the beginning of my tabs list like that.

Chrome is an awesome browser when i just want to open a site or two quickly and then exit, but I'm completely addicted to my many-tabs approach, and haven't found any browser other than Firefox that's able to handle the workload i throw at it.

Edited 2010-09-16 06:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by orestes
by Dave_K on Thu 16th Sep 2010 13:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by orestes"
Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

Agreed. I often find it very useful to be able to browse with a large number of tabs, and I don't want either the browser or its UI breaking under the strain.

Chrome is fine for checking webmail and Facebook, or watching some videos on YouTube, but I find it completely unusable for heavy browsing. Apart from its limited UI, Chrome can become painfully slow and unresponsive if I'm not very careful to keep open tabs to a minimum.

I often browse around news sites and forums, opening interesting stories and posts for later reading. At the same time I might be researching a topic, keeping interesting pages open for references, and maybe discussing it on another site. Or I'll be shopping around, with multiple review sites and online stores open to compare products and prices.

When using the browser like that I find that it's easy to build up a large number of tabs without really noticing. Even with browser limitations, I find that keeping everything open is much more efficient than temporarily bookmarking pages that I'll only look at once. I find that that kind of micro management of tabs to keep their number small interrupts and slows down browsing.

To me Opera's the only browser that can cope with that kind of heavy use without extensions. AFAIK it's the only one that provides a scrollable vertical list of tabs that can be filtered by keyword. Add the ctrl+tab or right-mouse-button+scrollwheel for cycling through the last tabs opened, and MDI capabilities like tiling tabs alongside each other within the window, and I find that it can even cope with 100+ tabs quite smoothly if necessary.

With most displays widescreen these days, I find it strange that more browsers don't offer a vertical tab bar as a standard feature. Especially considering that Opera has had this option for as long as it has had tabs.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Comment by orestes
by Rick_IE_OutreachTeam on Sun 19th Sep 2010 18:15 in reply to "Comment by orestes"
Rick_IE_OutreachTeam Member since:
2010-09-19

Well it looks like everyone is giving the IE9 Beta a fair chance. For you folks with multiple Tabs and consistent browsing habits, there are the new features such as Tear out Tabs, that allow you to pull out a tab and create a new Browsing Window. Pinned Sites, lets you pin a tab to the Task Bar and have it run Like an App. You can resizes the Address bar to increase room for tabs. And you can even tear out a couple of tabs and use Windows 7's Snap feature to snap two tabs into your desktop. So there are a lot of options to help you manage your browsing experience. Let me know if anyone has any questions and I can see if I can help.

Reply Parent Score: 1