Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Sep 2010 21:49 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Graphics, User Interfaces "Adobe Flash Player 'Square' is a preview release that enables native 64-bit support on Linux, Mac OS, and Windows operating systems, as well as enhanced support for Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 beta. We have made this preview available so that users can test existing content and new platforms for compatibility and stability."
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One million WebM videos milestone
by lemur2 on Thu 16th Sep 2010 05:26 UTC
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

http://blog.webmproject.org/2010/08/easy-tricks-for-finding-webm-vi...

On the WebM project blog, a recent post shows "Easy Tricks for Finding WebM Videos in YouTube".

The same post states that "today, the one million most popular videos of any size on YouTube are also available in the WebM format".

This milestone of one million of the most popular Youtube videos available today in WebM format, together with the tips for making a browser search tool for them in some browsers, means that browser such as Firefox and Opera which render WebM with HTML5 but not H.264 are becoming increasingly viable.

The blog post also indicates how to change a YouTube link to fetch the WebM version of the video:

Directly Accessing WebM Videos by URL

To find out if any YouTube video is available in WebM, simply add &html5=True (make sure True is capitalized) to the end of the video URL. If there is a WebM version of the video, it will open instead of the Flash version. For example:

Flash version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dz6gFokvOr0
WebM version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dz6gFokvOr0&html5=True


Developments such as these in conjunction with the arrival soon of IE9, Firefox 4 et al may mean that Flash might possibly become no longer needed by many people. Given that Flash doesn't work on the iPad, then HTML5, CSS3, SVG, animated SVG and ECMAscript might well soon be in a position to become the default "rich web content" platform.

HTML5/WebM will be supported on Firefox, Chrome, Opera and also on IE9 (if the user installs a suitable WebM codec, which would doubtless be made available by Google). Being the most widely supported, this could therefore become the default for delivery of video over the web.

Reply Score: 2

dvhh Member since:
2006-03-20

if only flash was only for reading video

Reply Parent Score: 5

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

if only flash was only for reading video


In the same way that HTML5, CSS3, SVG, animated SVG and ECMAscript are not only for reading video, do you mean?

Given the soon-to-be-realised presence and performance of HTML5, CSS3, SVG, animated SVG, Canvas and ECMAscript, the poor performance of Flash, and the absence of Flash on some platforms such as iPad and some phones, it could easily become the case that rich web content moves quite rapidly away from Flash to a new standards platform comprising: HTML5, CSS3, SVG, animated SVG, Canvas, fast ECMAscript and other emerging technologies like Open Video, audio, WebGL, touch events, device orientation and geo location.

http://hacks.mozilla.org/2010/08/introducing-the-new-mdn-website/

https://mozillalabs.com/gaming/2010/09/07/welcome-to-mozilla-labs-ga...
Modern Open Web technologies introduced a complete stack of technologies such as Open Video, audio, WebGL, touch events, device orientation, geo location, and fast JavaScript engines which make it possible to build complex (and not so complex) games on the Web. With these technologies being delivered through modern browsers today, the time is ripe for pushing the platform.


Even IE9 will support much of this:
http://www.osnews.com/story/23811/Internet_Explorer_9_Beta_Released

... without requiring a plugin.

Edited 2010-09-16 06:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


HTML5/WebM will be supported on Firefox, Chrome, Opera and also on IE9 (if the user installs a suitable WebM codec, which would doubtless be made available by Google). Being the most widely supported, this could therefore become the default for delivery of video over the web.


I'm all for HTML5 websites since they will encourage a movement away from older browsers and Flash ads but video delivery is still a problem because of DRM.

Dealing with Flash brings to mind the expression very slowly catchy monkey. You'd have to get the install base of HTML5 comparable to Flash before even proposing it as an alternative to content producers like Hulu. When it comes to video there aren't enough advantages to make up for the low install base.

However HTML5 has a significant advantage over Flash when it comes to website interfaces. Not only does HTML5 work on mobiles but the early interactive demos of HTML5 feel damn smooth in comparison to Flash. Exclusive content is what will push HTML5 adoption.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" HTML5/WebM will be supported on Firefox, Chrome, Opera and also on IE9 (if the user installs a suitable WebM codec, which would doubtless be made available by Google). Being the most widely supported, this could therefore become the default for delivery of video over the web.
I'm all for HTML5 websites since they will encourage a movement away from older browsers and Flash ads but video delivery is still a problem because of DRM. Dealing with Flash brings to mind the expression very slowly catchy monkey. You'd have to get the install base of HTML5 comparable to Flash before even proposing it as an alternative to content producers like Hulu. When it comes to video there aren't enough advantages to make up for the low install base. However HTML5 has a significant advantage over Flash when it comes to website interfaces. Not only does HTML5 work on mobiles but the early interactive demos of HTML5 feel damn smooth in comparison to Flash. Exclusive content is what will push HTML5 adoption. "

The vast majority of video on the web is not DRM protected ... it comes largely from sources such as people's own video cameras and phones.

In any event, commercial interests (i.e. videos for rent) such as Hulu represent only a tiny portion of the "video over the web" market. Such interests do not set the agenda. If Hulu want to deliver video for rent via DRM, they can simply provide their own separate client player software for the purpose.

"Exclusive content" is a niche market that won't IMO have much influence at all in HTML5 adoption. DRM is a horribly borked concept anyway. BTW, apparently the master HDCP key may have been revealed recently, were you aware?.
http://www.osnews.com/story/23806/HDCP_Master_Key_May_Have_Leaked

http://www.osnews.com/permalink?441318
It's time the content industry starts looking at optimum curves for their pricing.


Now there is a thought. If video disks and downloads were say a quarter or less of their current price and had no DRM, and downloads could be delivered to and played on any device the users wanted, then digital videos would probably sell like hotcakes and no-one would bother with piracy.

Edited 2010-09-16 23:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4