Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Sep 2010 21:49 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Graphics, User Interfaces "Adobe Flash Player 'Square' is a preview release that enables native 64-bit support on Linux, Mac OS, and Windows operating systems, as well as enhanced support for Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 beta. We have made this preview available so that users can test existing content and new platforms for compatibility and stability."
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RE: WebM and Flash.
by lemur2 on Fri 17th Sep 2010 03:26 UTC in reply to "WebM and Flash. "
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

Two observations. "Machinarium" is a Flash game - and it has a lot to tell you about the maturity of the development tools for Flash.


As Adobe have already shown, it is relatively easy to make a plugin so that any tool which can write to (develop for) for Flash can also write to (develop for) HTML5/CSS3/SVG/Canvas/ECMAscript.

There is no such thing as a WebM camera. No such thing as professional production in WebM. Google Shopping returns 40,000 hits for "H.264." Home video. Mobile devices. The prosumer camcorder. In-store security and so on. That is not going to change anytime soon.


Are you sure?
http://www.webmproject.org/about/supporters/
Companies who have to pay royalties now for H.264 won't have to pay them for WebM.

These hardware companies in particular ... won't have to pay royalties on the WebM chips they produce
http://www.videantis.de/
http://www.viewcast.com/
http://www.verisilicon.com/en/
http://www.ti.com/
http://www.logitech.com/
http://www.freescale.com/
http://www.marvell.com/
http://www.mips.com/
http://c2micro.com/
http://www.arm.com/
http://www.broadcom.com/
http://www.amd.com/
http://www.imgtec.com/
http://www.qualcomm.com/

nor will the camcorder/security camera/home video/mobile devices/whatever production companies have to pay, either.

This is precisely why so many companies have jumped on to the WebM bandwagon.

Enjoy.

YouTube simply transcodes H.264 and other sources.


So? Transcoding is the first source of video data for any codec at all (even H.264 when it first came out). Why should WebM be any different? (Apart of course from WebM being free of royalties for all concerned once you have your video in that format).

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