Linked by David Adams on Mon 4th Oct 2010 19:32 UTC, submitted by Idefix
OSNews, Generic OSes Once upon a time, operating systems used to matter a lot; they defined what a computer could and couldn't do... Today, there's only one operating system: Unix (okay, there are two, but we'll get to that). This is why I contend that the OS doesn't matter - or that we need to take another look at the word's content, at what we mean when we say 'Operating System'.
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"There is only one."
by SamuraiCrow on Tue 5th Oct 2010 00:27 UTC
SamuraiCrow
Member since:
2005-11-19

The author claims that the only exception to the rule that there is only one OS (and that's UNIX), is Windows. It may be the only major OS that is more than subsisting but there are more OSs that used to be big that aren't anymore.

BeOS (and its open-source counterpart, Haiku) is much better than UNIX ever will be. Sadly, since it was built on GCC and other UNIX-like infrastructure, it doesn't cut the umbilical cord enough.

AmigaOS and MorphOS (and the open-source counterpart AROS) are both pretty fast and light compared to UNIX due to their custom kernals, but unfortunately, as time goes on, they need to run more Linux code and less native code and are succumbing to the peer pressure.

Singularity was designed to be different. But according to their article in the Communications of the ACM, they are going to try to integrate those features into the existing OS over time. Look forward to Windows 8 or 9 when they finally ditch hardware-based memory management techniques and adopt software-based ones that have finer granularity and can be optimized away at the compiler level when not needed. Oh well, at least they put some of their research money to work instead of feeding only hype like most of their bosses do. Sadly, this software may only see the server by the time it comes out.

Reply Score: 2

RE: "There is only one."
by tylerdurden on Tue 5th Oct 2010 19:23 in reply to ""There is only one.""
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

"BeOS (and its open-source counterpart, Haiku) is much better than UNIX ever will be AT DOING NOTHING"

There, I fixed that for you.

How exactly is BeOS, an operating system that has been dead for a decade, better than unix? It had a awful networking stack, almost no drivers, no multiuser, and basically no application base to speak of, no real value proposition other than it could boot up "real fast." So on what metric exactly do you base you utterly qualitative and arbitrary statement?

Granted it had a filesystem which supported metadata. So you could boot up real fast, and do queries on useless data since there were no apps. That makes it "better" than UNIX how exactly?

Edited 2010-10-05 19:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: "There is only one."
by SamuraiCrow on Wed 6th Oct 2010 00:58 in reply to "RE: "There is only one.""
SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

How exactly is BeOS, an operating system that has been dead for a decade, better than unix? It had a awful networking stack, almost no drivers, no multiuser, and basically no application base to speak of, no real value proposition other than it could boot up "real fast." So on what metric exactly do you base you utterly qualitative and arbitrary statement?

Granted it had a filesystem which supported metadata. So you could boot up real fast, and do queries on useless data since there were no apps. That makes it "better" than UNIX how exactly?


Since when is the quality of the OS dependent on the apps ported to it? The OS could be great but if there are no apps it is useless, agreed. But I plan on writing more software in the future for Haiku than for SCO UNIX. UNIX is dead, long live UNIX.

Linux I plan on supporting because there are a lot of users of it but UNIX is designed for server usage and multiuser supercomputers. Haiku is a single-user OS and designed for an entirely different market.

C++ kicks ass against the C underpinnings used to create UNIX but there are very few OSs built on object-oriented architecture. Haiku and BeOS are written in C++. MacOS X, as you mentioned, has many of its internal apps written in Objective C.

Also, see what I said about Microsoft Singularity. It's written in an excellent programming language (Sing#) which defines it as something different and special from plain UNIX. I can foresee a time when a derivative from Singularity kicks UNIX off the servers for good. Then you'll wish for the day that Haiku was on your hard drive, because then UNIX will truly be dead.

My point is that, IMHO, UNIX is the tried and true but been there and done that architecture that people only come crying to when all other options have failed. It is the least user-friendly OS that has ever been conceived. The sooner it dies the better. Same goes for Solaris and the parts of Linux that date back to the original GNU projects such as GCC. I hope that more streamlined approaches dominate the world someday and UNIX is the second-biggest obstacle to that occurring.

Reply Parent Score: 1