Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 17th Oct 2010 21:30 UTC
Legal And we have another interesting development in the ongoing and ever-expanding idiocy that is the War of the High-Fiving Lawyers Mobile Patent World War. Motorola, now a central player in this worldwide conflict that is hurting consumers' wallets and clogging legal systems all over the world, has come to HTC's rescue by seeking to invalidate the patents Apple sued HTC with earlier this year.
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RE[3]: Motorola...
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 18th Oct 2010 00:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Motorola..."
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

A programmer patenting his code is the same as an author patenting his book; completely superfluous as both are already protected through copyright.

If you are in favour of software patents, you are basically saying that it is okay for CNN to patent their report on a news event, and then suing the BBC because the BBC also reports on that news event.

Software is protected by copyright. That's more than enough.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[4]: Motorola...
by lemur2 on Mon 18th Oct 2010 01:09 in reply to "RE[3]: Motorola..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

A programmer patenting his code is the same as an author patenting his book; completely superfluous as both are already protected through copyright. If you are in favour of software patents, you are basically saying that it is okay for CNN to patent their report on a news event, and then suing the BBC because the BBC also reports on that news event. Software is protected by copyright. That's more than enough.


Agreed.

As long as software providers are required to "do their own work" (i.e. in this case, write their own code), then each provider is not directly copying the work of any other software provider.

Each provider will have to employ programmers to write their code, they won't be able to simply copy (i.e. steal) the code from someone else.

If a given feature from one provider is an attractive, innovative new feature, then the first one to market with such a feature will be rewarded for producing it. Subsequently allowing other software providers to produce a similar feature will provide more employment and it will stimulate further innovation, becuase the newcomers to the market will need to have a better-than-the-original feature.

Without software patents there is still profit for innovators, there is more innovation, there is a lot less wastage and unnecessary costs through litigation, and there is more employment for programmers.

Where is the downside in dropping software patents, and protecting software only through copyrights?

Reply Parent Score: 7