Linked by David Adams on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 16:36 UTC, submitted by Amy Bennett
Windows As of today, Microsoft won't allow manufacturers to install XP on new netbooks," says blogger Kevin Fogarty. "That doesn't mean corporate customers who special-order hardware with XP won't be able to get it, or even that its market share ( 60 percent!) will drop any time soon.... It just means XP has taken the first babystep toward obsolescence and the long (really long, considering its market share) slide down toward the pit of minor operating systems like the MacOS X (4.39 percent) , Java ME (.95 percent) and "Other" (which I think is an alternative spelling for "Linux" (.85 percent).
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RE: Maybe an overdue step
by vocivus on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 17:56 UTC in reply to "Maybe an overdue step"
vocivus
Member since:
2010-03-13

I don't think that disallowing XP on new netbooks is automatically a boon for Linux. I think this notion presupposes that Win7 is not a good candidate for a netbook, or at least that it isn't as good as WinXP.

In fact, Win7 runs pretty freakin' well on netbooks, and in my humble opinion it's actually much better than XP. I wouldn't put it on an eee701, but I would definitely opt for it over XP on anything current.

OTOH, I've had no end of frustration with getting Ubuntu working on systems that handled Win7 without a hitch. (GMA500 is a PITA).

I'm not an MS fanboy, but I don't see the market swarming to Linux when they can't get their XP.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Maybe an overdue step
by nt_jerkface on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 19:03 in reply to "RE: Maybe an overdue step"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

I don't think that disallowing XP on new netbooks is automatically a boon for Linux.


I don't think that even if Linux was popular on netbooks that it would change the inertia behind Windows. Best case scenario would be that people buy them as secondary devices for surfing and media playing. Even if 5% of the population bought them that would still not encourage ISVs to port over their major applications. Since they are only being bought for light use MS could also offer CE as an option.

What Linux fans need to do is give the desktop a break for a while. Let KDE and QT bake for a few years.

Reply Parent Score: 3