Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th Oct 2010 19:00 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Well, this is sure to raise a few eyebrows here and there. Today, at the Ubuntu Developer Summit, Mark Shuttleworth held his keynote speech, and in it, he announced that Ubuntu will switch to the Unity user interface come release, for both the netbook as well as the desktop, leaving the GNOME user interface behind (but keeping the GNOME platform).
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RE[2]: Comment by Luminair
by Kroc on Tue 26th Oct 2010 11:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Luminair"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

What are you talking about? Just three years ago we were arguing how iOS had *no* consistency with anything before it.

Apple are successful because they pay attention to the details and don't just say "ship it" unless it has been thoroughly scrutinised. Other companies rush themselves too much and sacrifice everything to get it out quickly. Apple do not rush (the iPad was started _before_ the iPhone).

The web has succeeded and that's about as un-uniform and inconsistent as it gets.

Linux on the desktop doesn't need consistency, it needs to stop shipping half-baked products. Every time I boot the latest Ubuntu, I am able to find show-stopping user experience bugs within 15 minutes.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Comment by Luminair
by sorpigal on Tue 26th Oct 2010 14:53 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Luminair"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

This.

What Ubuntu was good at when it started was what I call integration, which could also be stated as "We took time to see that these things actually worked" instead of just compiling and shipping. This was refreshing at the time, but they never followed through on that initial promise.

A Linux system could be as nice as Mac OS X. All you need to do is hire a half dozen developers and some testers and designers and sit down with a set of functionality you want and a specific set of packages and bang on it until everything is nice, then ship it. What you can't do is package $everything and you can't ship unpatched close-to-upstream things if the upstream isn't willing to accept patches that make their app integrate better on just your system.

It's a lot of work and a lot of effort and when you're done you'll have laughably out of date versions of your software, since it will take months to properly refine each release. You'd have to have the balls to not care about this and keep focusing on a minimal feature set and high quality. It could have been done at any time in the last ~5-10 years. It hasn't been and it probably won't be, but there you are.

Reply Parent Score: 3