Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Oct 2010 20:48 UTC
Microsoft Most websites glossed over this, but we didn't. Silverlight, once touted as Microsoft's answer to Adobe's Flash, has been retooled from its original purpose. Microsoft is betting big on HTML5 instead, turning Silverlight into the development platform for Windows Phone, and that's it. So... Silverlight is dead - long live Silerlight?
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lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

Don't go off on a tangent, you're like a goddamn robot, you don't respond to points made, you just regurgitate the same misinformation. Nothing regarding Silverlight streaming was particularly closed.


The VC1 codec is closed. The licensed H.264 codec is closed. Both of them are available only from microsoft, only as x86/x86_64 binary blobs, and only for SLED.

Parts of the Mono platform, required to run Moonlight on Linux, are closed. The license to run those is available only to SLED customers.

HTML5 can, and did do the variable bitrate streaming that you criticized as a Silverlight only construct. Microsoft themselves in fact pushed this for the iPhone.


Quote, please.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

[q]Don't go off on a tangent, you're like a goddamn robot, you don't respond to points made, you just regurgitate the same misinformation. Nothing regarding Silverlight streaming was particularly closed.


The VC1 codec is closed. The licensed H.264 codec is closed. Both of them are available only from microsoft, only as x86/x86_64 binary blobs, and only for SLED.


Parts of the Mono platform, required to run Moonlight on Linux, are closed. The license to run those is available only to SLED customers.


Actually they're far from requirements, hence why they're optional additional downloads.

The same way some HTML5 video is H264, other is WebM, and other is Theora, that's how Silverlight streaming works.

Again, I've asked you multiple times, to quit passing judgement on Silverlight as a whole based only on it's multimedia subsystem which is a very small slice of the pie.

Why not talk about XAML, or the C# language or runtime itself? All which have explicit non aggression promises from Microsoft. Why not talk about those?

Oh, doesn't fit your narrative, gotcha.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Again, I've asked you multiple times, to quit passing judgement on Silverlight as a whole based only on it's multimedia subsystem which is a very small slice of the pie.

Why not talk about XAML, or the C# language or runtime itself? All which have explicit non aggression promises from Microsoft. Why not talk about those?


Because they aren't entirely relevant to this thread.

Oh, doesn't fit your narrative, gotcha.


Put it this way, to try to get through to people that are slow on the uptake: It isn't the acceptable parts of Silverlight that have caused it to be shunted into a background role out of the main web, it is the unacceptable parts.

If Microsoft were to simply make the restricted parts unrestricted, and able to be implemented by any party for any platform without costs as is the case for XAML, or the C# language or CLI (or indeed as is the case for the competition, HTML5/WebM/CSS3/Javascript/Canvas/SVG), then there would be no issue, and Silverlight would be wholly acceptable and could have become widely implemented and widely used.

Microsoft's dog-in-the-manger "this bit is for us only" attitude is what has killed, and is still killing, Silverlight. It won't be widely accepted until Microsoft drop that position.

Actually, belay that. It is probably too late now. Given their previous attitudes, Silverlight will probably never be widely accepted (due to lack of being able to trust what Microsoft say) no matter what Microsoft do now.

I can do things in Silverlight that webprogrammers can really, only dream of doing in HTML5. The capability is just not there.


It doesn't matter. As a webprogrammer, you can't deliver it anyway to all web participants from any host if you use Silverlight.

Edited 2010-11-01 04:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2