Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Nov 2010 22:49 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Fedora Core Fedora 14 has been released. "The Fedora Project today announced the availability of Fedora 14, the latest version of its free open source operating system distribution. The Fedora Projects leads the advancement of free and open source software with a new distribution released approximately every six months."
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Pretty solid with some nice new toys
by tux68 on Thu 4th Nov 2010 00:04 UTC
tux68
Member since:
2006-10-24

I've been dismayed with Fedora for a while now. A mindset has taken over to attempt to duplicate the desktop experience from other operating systems and Linux distributions. This comes at a cost of resources and "capabilities" that to my mind should be left to these other players. Let Ubuntu have all the aunt Tilly's of the world... shrug.

Having said that, Fedora 14 has been running here for a couple of days with "systemd" enabled and it has been a relatively enjoyable experience. Setting up daemons to run at boot is actually much easier with systemd than with SysV init scripts.

It was also very nice to offer an interested neighbour a Linux virtual machine. Installed the SPICE client on his Windows machine and he has been happily connecting over wireless to a F14 VM and playing around with it remotely. Pretty sweet.

All 'round good effort.

Reply Score: 2

ozonehole Member since:
2006-01-07

Interesting about systemd. I've been reading about it lately, for those who haven't heard:

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/systemd

Are you noticing any performance boost? I haven't heard of any other distros implementing systemd yet, but it might make we want to try Fedora.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tux68 Member since:
2006-10-24

Are you noticing any performance boost? I haven't heard of any other distros implementing systemd yet, but it might make we want to try Fedora.


Yes, it's faster booting up, say 20 seconds instead of 35. But that may be because i'm booting from a SSD drive; there are murmurs that you wont see any speed up on rotating media. Things probably need time to mature.

Frankly the speed up wasn't that important to me since the box is rarely rebooted anyway. But the administration features are appealing and worth playing around with.

You can try systemd on Gentoo if you go that way. Open SUSE has developers working on systemd as well and it should appear there for testing soon if it hasn't already.

Cheers

Reply Parent Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I've been dismayed with Fedora for a while now. A mindset has taken over to attempt to duplicate the desktop experience from other operating systems and Linux distributions. This comes at a cost of resources and "capabilities" that to my mind should be left to these other players. Let Ubuntu have all the aunt Tilly's of the world... shrug.


Weird, the passage of time is. Red Hat was always seen as the Microsoft of Linux. its what Aunt Tilly used because she couldn't figure out Slackware, the good Linux distro that self respecting people ran.

Reply Parent Score: 2

thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

"I've been dismayed with Fedora for a while now. A mindset has taken over to attempt to duplicate the desktop experience from other operating systems and Linux distributions. This comes at a cost of resources and "capabilities" that to my mind should be left to these other players. Let Ubuntu have all the aunt Tilly's of the world... shrug. "

Could you please elaborate on that? I ask because Fedora, or more specifically Red Hat, have always been one of the strongest contributors to the desktop components of a Linux system.

Edited 2010-11-04 07:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm not seeing where they're chasing Aunt Tilly at all. Sure they include more "pretty" features than a hand built Debian or Slack install but the target user is nowhere near the Ubuntus of the world. It dances too close to the bleeding edge and focuses too much on next generation business tech to ever be truly comfortable for the youtube and facebook set.

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Is it possible to get a listing of which order things will start at boot, with systemd?

This is my biggest frustration with upstart: you have no way to tell which order things will start at boot. And every boot can use a different order.

Managing SysV init scripts and runlevels is a pain. But trying to get any semblance of order out of upstart is just as bad.

RC on FreeBSD is dependency-based as well, but at least there you can get the general order that things will start via a simple "rcorder /etc/rc.d/* /usr/local/etc/rc.d/*"

What's the equivalent for upstart/systemd?

Reply Parent Score: 2

brion Member since:
2010-11-04

I'm not sure there's really an applicable concept of "what order things will load in".

By definition they're trying to get everything that's needed started up as fast as possible; this may include starting multiple things at the same time which don't depend on each other, and when other things that do depend on them get started will depend on how long those previous things took to start, and whether they're actually needed or in use.

It would be similarly difficult to ask what order the user will start programs or visit web sites in after logging in; the order will depend on what the user has to or wants to do, what messages came into their inboxes, what links they receive in email and chat, etc.

More generally, I really hate to rely on assuming that things are going to start up in a particular order; unless you're doing cold boots constantly, you may have services starting and stopping at runtime, say as software is updated or new services get activated. To be reliable, the control systems for these should be explicitly set up to ensure that things load each other when needed rather than just hoping everything comes up in the right order... otherwise you tend to get surprised when that next cold boot comes, and the simple manual ordering wasn't right after all.

Accept your new non-deterministic overlords! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1