Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 6th Nov 2010 00:27 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption Well, this was to be expected: an anti-virus company complaining that Microsoft's Security Essentials - by far the best anti-virus tool for Windows - is anti-competitive. Microsoft recently began offering MSE as an optional download via the optional Microsoft Update service (which is not Windows Update), and Trend Micro (a patent troll) is going into boo-hoo mode over it.
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Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

To these two excellent points I would like to add that I can certainly see why Trends might be miffed about MSE although applying the term antitrust is probably not correct. This is actually more like unfair competition and price dumping, MS is more or less dumping a new product into an existing market and using profits from other products to cover their losses.
I'm not saying Trends is necessarily right but I can see why this behavior would upset them.
I also hate their products too btw, but making crap products isn't against the law.

Reply Parent Score: 3

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

This is actually more like unfair competition and price dumping, MS is more or less dumping a new product into an existing market and using profits from other products to cover their losses.

MSE is not a new product, it has existed already for quite some time. So none of this applies.

Reply Parent Score: 2

vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

Which still doesn't make Trend Micro's complaint something I can agree with. People have been paying for Yahoo Mail plus before GMail arrived. People have been paying for IntelliJ IDEA before Eclipse surfaced (having reportedly cost $40 million to IBM). And these are probably not the sole examples but my mind can't find another valid one right now. The whole h.264 and WebM? Google has "given" web users several good free products that are not search-centric. I bet some of these markets had vendors (of non-free solutions/products) that were already established. Best example, Linux vs Windows...

Big players "dumping" markets looks like a fact of life. Businesses should just learn to deal with it, either by establishing a monopoly and trying to crush the competition, or by releasing products better than the competition. I won't feel sorry for Trend Micro, and that's not just because I use Avira. Imagine if people using MSE were left "in the dark" just to protect AV companies' bottom line.

Reply Parent Score: 4